Meet Your Rancher: Angie Newbold

Raising cattle is what we would call an active job. You don’t sit a whole lot, unless you consider riding horses a form of sitting, and on the rare occasion, it sometimes involves unintentional running. But some ranchers choose to run for fun. Yup, we said it: run for fun. It’s a crazy thought, we know, but one that Angie Newbold, Arizona beef rancher, embraces.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

An active, healthy lifestyle is one that Angie and her husband Cole have always embraced, and, with their current occupations, this goal has mostly worked itself out. Angie and Cole Newbold are both first generation ranchers, meaning they are the first in their family to work on cattle ranches. This couple currently resides and works on the M-K Ranch owned by Oddonetto Family north of Globe, Arizona, where they help to raise registered Santa Gertrudis (purebred breed of cattle who are recorded in a registry) and commercial (cross bred cattle who are not registered) cattle. Cole is the full-time cowboy at the ranch while Angie works in town during the week and helps on weekends and on other busy days at the ranch.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

While ranch life is active, a town job isn’t. As an active child, Angie could be found team roping daily, practicing for swim team, along with any number of other outdoor activities so it only makes sense she picked up another physical activity as an adult when life required more sitting. Running was her activity of choice, outside of ranching, because it’s a free sport that you can basically do anywhere and anytime you choose. With miles of dirt roads surrounding the ranch, it’s a logical option to expend energy she builds up from her office job.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

For her husband Cole, living and working on the ranch gives him plenty of opportunities for physical activity as the work is never done. Just like all cattlemen and women, Cole and Angie, and the owners of the M-K Ranch, care about the cattle in their care and about the land they use to raise those animals. Just like how Angie is focused on keeping herself healthy, also of importance is keeping the land healthy. This is done in many ways such as pasture rotation, water development, and picking the right breed of cattle for the land. One example is the implementation of the registered herd of Santa Gertrudis cattle. These animals are known for their hardiness, meaning they can do well in hot, dry climates, such as that around Globe. They require less resources than other breeds might.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

While Angie might not run with a local running club like many who live in town, she does have an avid group of running companions. These members of her running club all have four legs and bark more than they speak but are the perfect companions on the back roads as they offer some entertainment and protection. Angie jokes that the president of her running club is Josie, a small Cairn Terrier. These dogs not only run with Angie but also work on the ranch to help with gathering cattle which, in many circumstances, can relieve pressure on the cowboys and horses.

Josie, a small Cairn Terrier, is the president of Angie’s running club! Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

Cole, Angie’s husband, was a runner in high school and helped encourage Angie to start running. “He said, just try a 5k and see if you like it,” reports Angie who then mentions it was all down hill (or uphill, depending on the course) from there. Being a competitive person, Angie couldn’t stop there and has three marathon finishes to date with goals of more. She has recently discovered trail running and is actively competing in races around the state of Arizona. With a busy schedule at work and on the ranch, adding training runs into her schedule can be challenging but Angie states it’s a good mental break. In addition to multiple runs a week, Angie cross trains with weights on a regular basis and tries to stick to a healthy, balanced diet. Her fuel of choice includes lean beef, pinto beans, and fresh veggies and fruit, along with eggs and whole milk.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

When asked for her advice on staying active with running, Angie emphasizes cross training, whether that is with weights or ranch work, if you have that option. Angie’s favorite distance to run is 6 miles because it serves as a great way to stay in shape and offers her a mental break from her office job and from recording cattle information such as birthdate, location, health records, progeny reports. The power of rewards is an important part of training too. After every race, Angie always has a good old fashion cheeseburger with all the trimmings and the good cheese. A big side of fries is always welcome! She says that during training her go-to beef meals are fajitas and pasta with meat sauce. Both are easy, filling, and packed full of the nutrients her body needs to get her down the back roads and back home.

This blog post is made possible by the generous support of the Arizona Cattle Industry Research and Education Foundation.

HIIT for Heart

This post was written by Celia Dubauskas. Celia is an undergraduate student at Arizona State University, studying Nutrition Communication. This spring, she has been an intern for Arizona Beef Council, creating written and social content for our platforms. Celia is an experienced fitness professional and is certified as a personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Her passion for fitness has fueled her interest in nutrition and learning more about health and diet culture.

Did you know the American Heart Association certifies eight cuts of beef as part of a heart-healthy diet? Give Celia’s HIIT for Heart workout a try and then refuel with some delicious and nutritious beef to get that strong, healthy heart you’ve always wanted (and need!).

There is no doubt that exercise is good for both our physical health and mental well-being.  Consistent exercise routines create habit and intention, increasing our cardiovascular health and ensuring proper dopamine levels. We set goals, and when we achieve them, we grow in confidence and strength.  Exercise makes us happy! 

So why don’t we do more?

One of the biggest challenges we face today is time.  Never have Americans been so busy.  We all get 24 hours in a day, but how we choose to spend that time varies person to person.  To many, it seems impossible to reach their fitness goals because there is no time to get to the gym or squeeze in a workout.  Some do not have the financial means to have a gym membership or invest in equipment. 

What if all you needed was to move your body for 20 minutes?  Can you make the time?  Sure you can!

Surely, it cannot be that easy.  But yes, it can! Interval training is the latest and greatest fitness trend.  By rapidly increasing your heart rate with a quick rest in between each exercise, you can burn more calories than a traditional weight and cardio session combined.  HIIT training has been proven to blast fat and improve heart health.

All you need is 20 minutes.

Here is a quick 20 minute HIIT workout you can do in the comfort of your own home or outside in the sun.  These five exercises will be performed for 30 seconds followed by a 30 second rest.  Repeat 4 times and there is your 20-minute fat-blasting workout.

Jumping Squats

Butt Kickers

Jumping Lunges

Push Ups

Mountain Climbers

30 Second Exercise

30 Second Rest

5 Exercises

Repeat 4x

Nourish your body with movement, and respect it for all that it allows you to do!  HIIT for happiness and HIIT for heart!

Monique Machiz: Best of Our Valley

Over the past decade, there has been a nationwide focal shift towards health and wellness.  Never has there been such a demand for fitness and nutrition services in the Phoenix valley and state of Arizona.  There are hundreds of health and fitness professionals across the state, but today I talked to Monique Machiz about her journey as a fitness professional and how she came to be voted the 2019 Best Trainer by Arizona Foothills Magazine “Best of Our Valley” contest.

Monique is a personal trainer for Tytin Fitness in Tempe, Arizona.  She works out of the wellness center she and her fiancé, Ty Mealey, opened in 2018: Arizona Aesthetics & Wellness.  Their personal training business was originally planted in a small Scottsdale studio, under the name Tytin Fitness in 2016.  The business grew so fast in just two years that the couple wanted to open a bigger second location for their personal training and other health and fitness services to call home.

 “We wanted to open a one-stop-shop for health and fitness.  AZA&W hosts Tytin Fitness personal training, as well as various medical and athletic recovery services.  Clients can come for a training session, followed by an adjustment with Dr. Cory Baker, our chiropractor, or increase the intensity of their training with Wesley Kress’s Breakthrough Performance & Rehab.  Those are just a few of our services.  In the future we would like to house physical therapists, aestheticians, and so many more!”

With the success that Monique has had over the last few years, I wanted to learn more about her professional journey and what got her into the fitness industry.  Monique had played sports her entire life.  She played basketball all the way into college.  After suffering an injury, she was forced to learn different ways to work out.  She began to do a lot of research about exercise and nutrition, and she even put together women’s workout groups at her school to teach her friends how to workout, as well.

After graduating from Whittier College with a B.S. in Kinesiology, Monique obtained her Personal Training Certification because, like many recent graduates, she was not sure exactly what she wanted to do: “I just knew I wanted to help people.”  She began personal training at a corporate gym and instantly fell in love.  She was able to teach people about health and fitness and pursue her passion at the same time.

With seven years of certified personal training, I was excited to hear a bit about Monique’s training and nutrition philosophy. 

“When it comes to nutrition, people tend to under eat.  There are so many preconceived notions that carbohydrates are the enemy and that you should eat low fat.  Food is 80% of the results we make in the gym.  Food is our friend.  Finding that overall balanced lifestyle is so important for my clients.  I try to stress an 80/20 approach.  It is important to be eating clean, whole foods most of the time, but food is also meant to be enjoyed.”

For her own personal diet, Monique likes to follow a higher fat approach.  “I have an endomorphic body type, so I perform well on a higher fat diet.  Beef is one of the predominant meats that I eat.  I have an easier time building muscle when I incorporate red meat into my diet.”  Not only does Monique train for overall health, she also competes in figure competitions.  She stressed to me the importance of nutrient timing and why she loves red meat for workout recovery.  “When it comes to making a meal plan, I love putting red meat post-workout.  Red meat is slower digesting, and because of the micronutrients and high creatine content, red meat can be awesome for recovery and for rebuilding the muscle.” While old-school bodybuilders tend to stress lean meats and fish, Monique believes red meat is a great food to incorporate in the diet without having to take a bunch of supplements.

Monique loves the bodybuilding style of training, as it is one of her hobbies, amidst her busy schedule.  But she understands most people are interested in fitness to lead a healthy lifestyle.  For many of her clients, she incorporates bodybuilding movements with a functional style of training. “I mix a little bit of both styles into my training. We need to make sure the body is moving well and functional for the client’s lifestyle.” 

To wrap up our interview, I asked Monique what she thinks the general public should know when navigating health and fitness: “Find what works for you.  It’s all about trial and error.  Try something and give it a month.  Don’t be afraid to mix things up, and don’t be afraid to research what you’re putting into your body.  Just because someone says something is healthy doesn’t mean it is.  Fitness is not a one-size-its-all.” 

To learn more about Monique Machiz, you can visit her social media and the Arizona Aesthetics & Wellness website.

Arizona Aesthetics & Wellness

Instagram: Monique Machiz


This post was written by Celia Dubauskas. Celia is an undergraduate student at Arizona State University, studying Nutrition Communication. This spring, she has been an intern for Arizona Beef Council, creating written and social content for our platforms. Celia is an experienced fitness professional and is certified as a personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Her passion for fitness has fueled her interest in nutrition and learning more about health and diet culture. Keep on eye out for upcoming posts!

Heart Health Month: How Beef Can Play an Important Role

aha-logoValentine’s Day and Heart Month make such a cute couple, don’t you think? New evidence shows lean beef and heart healthy diets go pretty well together, too. In a new study published in the January 2017 issue of American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Wayne Campbell, PhD, professor of nutrition science at Purdue University, and his research team conducted a review and analysis of 24 clinical trials on daily red meat intake and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Many doctors recommend that patients limit red meat intake to less than 3 servings a week, but this new study shows that eating greater than 3.5 servings per week does not negatively affect short-term cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure and blood cholesterol.  These findings can help put to rest some of the outdated notions against red meat consumption.

Putting all this great info into action takes delicious recipes. For the past six years, the American Heart Association has approved eight whole muscle cuts of beef and extra-lean ground beef for use in their Heart-Check mark program. We are excited to announce beef’s involvement in a new recipe certification program by the American Heart Association that we hope will inspire you to incorporate beef into heart healthy meals. Here are some examples of approved recipes that feature beef cuts that also meet criteria for “extra lean:”

confetti-beef-taco-saladConfetti Beef Taco Salad

citrus-marinated-beef-and-fruit-kabobsCitrus-Marinated Beef and Fruit Kabobs

sweet-potato-beef-mash-upSweet Potato Beef Mash-Up

 

Straight Talk on Beef’s Role in a Healthy Diet

By Shelley Johnson, R.D.
National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
Contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program

For decades consumers have been exposed to all kinds of conflicting information about the nutritional benefits of all types of food in the marketplace – this includes beef. Questions about food and health are often generated by emerging – and ever-evolving – science of diet and health.

Attention to nutrition began to escalate in the 1970s, when nutrition researchers captured the attention of legislators, regulators and those in a position to give dietary advice. It created an opportunity for the beef industry to deliver messages about the nutritional value of beef.

Over the past few decades, the beef industry has made progress in helping promote the use of sensible, science-based information about beef’s role in health. As a result of this straight-forward attitude, the beef industry has never been in a better position to promote beef’s positive role in the diet.  Following are encouraging updates about beef nutrition that will help set the story straight:

Following are encouraging updates about beef nutrition that will help set the story straight:

Fact: Heart-healthy diets with four ounces of lean beef can actually improve cholesterol and reduce heart disease risk. More than 20 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have showed that healthy diets containing 4-6 ounces of lean red meat, even daily, may improve cholesterol, blood pressure and weight management. The low fat diets that were once being promoted for heart health are not recommended anymore as a result of new science that examines the influence of the total diet on health.proteinbenefits

Furthermore, the fat profile of beef is frequently misunderstood. One third of beef’s saturated fatty acid is stearic acid, which has a neutral effect on cholesterol. And more than half ofbeef’s fatty acids are monounsaturated fat – the same kind found in olive oil.

Fact: Despite upward trends in obesity, as waistlines have expanded, beef intake has declined. The Meat, Eggs and Nuts category of American food consumption has increased just four percent between 1970 and 2008, while overall caloric intake has increased by 30 percent. Americans consume twice the refined grains recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines, and added sugars contribute 16 percent of the total calories to the American diet.

protein-challengeA related fact: higher protein diets with beef can help manage weight. Research shows that protein-rich diets that include beef support weight management. If you’d like to test this out for yourself, sign up for the 30 Day Protein Challenge at BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Fact: Building a healthy diet with lean beef can be a calorie-saver and add valuable nutrients. The new Dietary Guidelines released in 2015 emphasize variety and flexibility, and recommend lean meat. By-and-large, consumers are responding, and eating beef responsibly. Current research shows that beef consumption contributes only 5 percent of the calories to Americans’ diets, while supplying more than 10 percent of the daily value for 10 essential nutrients like zinc, iron and B-vitamins.

As Americans continue to battle the obesity crisis, beef can be part of the solution as a high-quality protein source, providing more nutrients in fewer calories than many other foods. Compared to beef, it takes more than twice the calories to get the same amount of protein from beans, nuts and grains.

Fact: Scientific evidence does not support a cause-and-effect relationship between meat and cancer. Some cancer reports in the past several years have suggested there might be a link between colorectal cancer and red meat. Furthermore, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at the World Health Organization (WHO) last fall said red meat was probably carcinogenic to humans.

After the IARC results were announced, media reports generated many questions and challenges about the conclusion. A few days later, though, the WHO attempted to temper their communication about the conclusions in the report.

One reason is probably that independent reviews of these reports present a different interpretation. They assert that “the totality of the available evidence does not support an independent positive association between red meat and cancer.”

Why? Because associations were based on correlation (not causation) in epidemiologic research (the study of health and disease among populations); because about half the time, no association was found; because when they were found, associations were weak; because initial results were confounded by unhealthy diets and lifestyles; and because the evidence is weakening over time with improved research quality.

Opportunities

The beef industry, through its Beef Checkoff Program, is doing more than just answering these questions to help people build healthier diets with beef.

For instance, we’re showing consumers how they can pair beef with healthy grains, vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy to improve nutrition profiles. Research has shown that consumers who ate more lean beef also ate more servings of vegetables. A new checkoff-funded focus, Families in Motion, is helping demonstrate that beef’s nutrient combination – zinc, iron and protein – provides essential fuel for active families, and when paired with fruits, vegetables and whole grains, beef makes a foundation of a nourishing meal. More information can be found on the “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner” website.

The bottom line is that there is credible information that Americans can build better diets with beef. It’s a science-based message everyone can appreciate. beefsbig10

 

Arizona Team Beef: Trisha Grant

Arizona Team Beef member Trisha Grant is a sports enthusiast, agricultural loan officer, University of Arizona Wildcat, and dog lover. Meet Trisha:

5-13-2016_Trisha cropped

 

Activity and fun have always been an important part of my life. I grew up in an active family whether it was playing sports, riding horses, or water skiing. As I’ve gotten older, staying active has become even more important – it’s what keeps me going physically and mentally. I can tell a difference in my health, focus, and mood when I’m not as active as I should be. Now the activities have changed to more running, hiking, and biking with friends and family. It keeps me young and happy. When halfway through a half or full marathon training program I may say that it’s a chore, but I really love it.

I wouldn’t be able to stay as active as I am without high-quality protein in my diet. It is just as important to my physical and mental health as staying active. Beef provides the fuel and energy I need to get through a long run or difficult hike. In fact, the protein beef provides helps my muscles recover more quickly, which is important when training for full marathons. My favorite lean cut is the tenderloin – we can grill one night and have steak salads to take to work the next day. I also appreciate that beef contains essential nutrients that help me get through the day including zinc, iron and B vitamins.

Beef is also the best part of my post-race routine! Nothing taste better than a big juicy burger (and maybe a cold beer) after a big race. Many of us joke that the during a long and/or hard run, the only thing that keeps us going is looking forward to that post-race meal.

My favorite race so far would have to be the Big Sur Marathon. It also happens to be the hardest race I’ve done. The views running along the coast on Highway 1 are amazing and breathe taking. Likewise, the elevation changes and wind are also “breathe taking” and brutal. There are all kinds of neat things along the course, including a grand piano at the top of Bixby Bridge at the halfway (13.1 miles) point. If you are looking for a challenging, beautiful, and adventurous marathon this is it! Now, if you are looking to PR (personal record), this is NOT the race for it. I’m so happy I ran it in 2015, and I will probably never run it again.

As for local races, there are so many good ones. One of my favorite half-marathons that we run every year is the Fiesta Bowl Half in December. It tends to be a smaller race and is a nice flat course, great for running a PR. The Phoenix Marathon and Half-Marathon are also great courses.

5-13-2016_Trisha John Dave_cropped.jpg
John Lillie, Dave Wood and Trisha after finishing the 2013 P.F. Chang’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon in Phoenix. Dave really did run the whole thing in his cow costume!

 

Ugh, What’s for Dinner?

Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.® Of course.

4-8-2016_Lauren with tongs
Hi, all! I’m Lauren. I love beef, red wine, and pie.

I think we can all agree on one thing: no one wants to get home from a long day at work and slave over the stove as our precious time ticks away. Maybe you’ve just sat in traffic for an hour or maybe you just got home from sweating up a storm at the gym. Either way, something quick and easy for dinner is in order.

I’d like to share with you one of my go-to weeknight dinners: steak salad. The ingredient options are endless and they can be a snap to throw together, while also remaining healthy and delicious. Have New York Strip leftover from last night’s steak house outing? Toss it in a salad. Out of ideas for that shredded or Ground Beef from Taco Tuesday? Make a salad. What to do with some of our favorite lean beef cuts (like Flank Steak)? Marinate them and, you guessed it, make a salad! Plus, it gets hot here in the desert and who wants to slave over a hot stove in the summer? Not me.

This week, I found my inspiration from a BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com recipe: Beef Steak Salad with Dried Cherries. I had a Skirt Steak ready to marinate and violà – a delicious, nutritious and fulfilling meal option. Prep was a snap. It could even be packed for lunch at work. Salad ingredients are easy to keep prepped in the fridge as easy go-tos. Then you can say a little “abracadabra” while tossing the salad ingredients in bowl and you are set in a jiffy.

The beauty of salad recipes? You don’t have to follow them exactly. If you don’t like blue cheese – exchange for feta. Have Tri-Tip to use? Go for it. Here are my ideas but don’t let me stifle your creativity. This is in the style of a no-recipe-recipe. If you are the type who needs a recipe, click on the link below.

BEEF STEAK SALAD (modified from this inspiration)

4-8-2016_salad_7

INGREDIENTS

  1. Beef Skirt Steak (or Top Sirloin, Flank Steak, any leftover steak). Note: see marinade idea below.
  2. Lettuce – I used romaine that I cleaned and chopped. Spring mix or Boston/Bib/Butter lettuce (apparently they are different) will also do.
  3. Dried cherries or cranberries or golden raisins. Use your discretion on how much you like.
  4. Crumbled blue cheese or feta cheese
  5. Sliced red onion
  6. Some nuts: I really like sweet and spicy pecans but other options are pine nuts or coarsely chopped walnuts or pecans, toasted.
  7. Diced avocado

DRESSING (I did follow this recipe and it was tasty. Or you can simply use extra virgin olive oil and red wine or balsamic vinegar and a dash of salt and pepper).

1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

INSTRUCTIONS
Important: If you are pre-marinating the beef (Flank and Skirt Steak need this extra treatment), here is a marinade you could use and follow these marinade tips. Or use the one in the original inspiration recipe.

  1. Combine dressing ingredients in medium bowl.
  2. Cut steak lengthwise in half and then crosswise into 1/8 to 1/4-inch thick strips. Add beef to remaining dressing; toss to coat. Cover and marinate in refrigerator 30 minutes.
  3. Remove beef from marinade; discard marinade. Heat large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add 1/2 of beef; stir-fry 1 to 2 minutes or until outside surface of beef is no longer pink. (Do not overcook.) Remove from skillet. Repeat with remaining beef.

If you are using leftover beef, start here (so easy!):

4. Combine lettuce and reserved dressing in large bowl; toss to coat. Don’t over dress! No one like a soggy salad. Arrange beef over lettuce; sprinkle with cheese, cherries, red onion, nuts, and avocado, as desired. Serve immediately.

4-8-2016_salad_6
Disclaimer: I don’t claim to be an exper food photograher. Just good enough for Instagram. 

Enjoy! What are your favorite salad ingredients to go with beef?

Fueled by Beef

In Arizona, and other states across the country, there is a group of athletes who proudly wear their T-Bone-emblazoned jerseys as they run, cycle, CrossFit, and hike on their quest to lead healthy lives through physical activity. Though they hail from different backgrounds, the one thing Arizona Team Beef members share is the need for high-quality protein in their diets and for these athletes, beef is what fuels them.

Team Beef Arizona

 

Arizona Team Beef has participated in marathons, adventure runs, triathlons and even spends many days horseback gathering cattle on the Arizona range. Athletic skill ranges from beginner to record holding race winners but, no matter the level of fitness, we all recognize the nutritional benefits of protein in one’s diet. Lean beef can play an important role in repairing and building muscle, maintaining weight, and benefit heart health, all while providing fuel for the finish.

Team Beef Fuel Finish logo

Beef provides 10 essential nutrients including iron, which shuttles oxygen from your lungs to your hard-working muscles ensuring you sustain and maximize your performance throughout the whole race (or whatever activity in which you engage). It also begins and speeds post-activity recovery leading to stronger muscles in a shorter amount of time. Include lean beef in your post-race regimen, just like our Team Beef members, to give your muscles what they need to recover quickly for your next adventure.

Bottom line? Beef really helps you perform.

 

Million Mile Month large-logo

As April begins, so does Million Mile Month, an athletic movement empowering people across the country to live healthier lives. Team Beef members from many states are logging their miles and/or minutes of activity (running, walking, biking, yoga-ing, CrossFitting, gardening, farming, swimming, zumba-ing). Sign up if you are interested – there are prizes for leaders nation-wide as well as Arizona specific! Running the month of April, this challenge is a great way for Team BEEF members, beef farmers and ranchers, and other beef lovers to participate together in this all-abilities challenge as we power up with protein.

ArizonaTeamBEEF_collage
Arizona Team Beef members burning up the asphalt

Eat Beef, Keep Slim

LilDudetteThrough the years, there have been many creative methods implemented to talk about the great beef which is raised in Arizona. One of those ways, in the 1950s, was to create a mascot for Arizona beef. Reg Manning, a famous artist best known for his cartooned saguaro cactus with the prominent nose, created a character who fit the bill perfectly for this job. This cartoon character was named Lil’ Dudette, and she had a hearty message to share with everyone: “To keep yourself trim – Eat Beef – Keep Slim!”

In 1955, after using a mannequin version of Lil’ Dudette in shop windows to promote beef, it was decided a live version was needed to help spread the word at larger events like the Arizona State Fair. The Arizona State Cowbelles, a strong organization of women who share information about beef, were on a mission to find the perfect Lil’ Dudette and when a Cowbelle is on a mission (now and then) you better not stand in her way. It sounds like it was an easy decision as Connie Cook from Willcox fit the description wonderfully. The Cowbelles are even quoted as saying, “Connie looks exactly like Reg Manning’s famous character, Lil’ Dudette ‘ought to look.” Connie’s family was also deeply rooted in Arizona ranch history having been in the cattle business in Willcox since 1893. It was a perfect fit.

Lil’ Dudette, aka Connie, was a hit! She made appearances at the Arizona State Fair that year and drew a crowd. It is reported in the November 1955 issue of the Arizona Cattlelog that 10,000 “7 Ways for 7 Days” beef-recipe folders were given away and nearly 30,000 people entered into a drawing to win 25o pounds of choice beef donated by the Beef Council. In the next year, it was reported that there was a film was produced entitled, “Lil’ Dudette,” which was entered in the Beef Promotion Contest at the American National Cattlemen’s convention and it won first prize!

We can’t say Lil’ Dudette was too far off when she sang out Protein Challengeher slogan about eating beef to keep slim. Significant research shows that people looking to lose or maintain a healthy weight, support a healthy metabolism and/or age more vibrantly may benefit from consuming a balanced amount of high-quality protein, within calorie goals. Luckily for us, we have a few more tools than Lil’ Dudette did to help people achieve these goals. One of those tools being the 30 Day Protein Challenge which is a fun, step-by-step way to help you get an optimal amount of protein throughout your day. Significant research shows that some people can lose and/or maintain a healthy weight, support a healthy metabolism, and age more vibrantly when they consume more high-quality protein, within calorie goals. Interested? Check it out here.