Halloween Dinner Ideas

It’s the big night full of fun costumes, trick-or-treating, and, most importantly, some family time. We want everyone to have the best night possible, and one way to help guarantee that happens is by leaving the house with a nice full belly! We’ve put together a recipe collection to help you make a healthy meal and do it quickly so you can get back to painting faces, adding accessories, and making sure everyone has their candy bucket ready to go.

Yummy Mummy Beef Pizzas

These quick and easy pizzas feature homemade beef sausage and have a mummy face made of string cheese. Perfect for Halloween night!

Click HERE for the full recipe.

Classic Beef Sloppy Joes

Delicious, quick, easy and FUN! That makes this classic sloppy joe recipes perfect for the big candy night.

For the full recipe, click HERE.

Big Game Fritos® Pie

Because just getting out of the house is hard, here is a recipe you can take on the go. Put the ingredients out on the table buffet style, let everyone add what they want and then head out to go collect candy!

Click HERE for the recipe.

Beef Chili

Depending on where you are, Halloween night can be a chilly one. So warm everyone up from the inside before they head out with this delicious and easy beef chili recipe.

Full recipe HERE.

Four-Way Slow Cooker Shredded Beef

This is an idea for the picky eaters and a way to make everyone happy with one meal. Cook up your beef and offer various ideas to your family. Everyone will walk away with a full belly!

Click HERE for the full recipe.

Beef Jerky Trail Mix

And if getting a meal in before trick-or-treating is just not going to happen, offer this delicious and easy snack full of protein and other nutrients. It’ll keep everyone fueled up for the night and not because of the sugar.

Click HERE for the full recipe.

Celebrate National Cheeseburger Day with these Delicious Recipes!

Celebrate National Cheeseburger Day on September 18th with a few of these great-tasting recipes created just for you by the culinary team over at Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. You will find a recipe for everyone in this collection, from the Lean Mean Cheeseburgers to the Classic Cheeseburger recipe. Check all of these out, and have a great National Cheeseburger Day!

Caribbean Cheeseburgers with Grilled Pineapple

Imagine a taste of the Caribbean as you bite into these burgers with jerk spices, mango and pineapple. You’re gonna love it.

Click HERE for the full recipe.

Bistro Cheeseburgers

Switch up your usual burger toppings with this French bistro-style cheeseburger recipe. Grilled onions and a tasty Dijon-style mustard sauce top these tasty cheeseburgers.

For the full recipe, click HERE.

Classic Beef Cheeseburgers

Master this classic burger recipe and you’ll be the king (or queen) of the grill from here on out!

Click HERE for the recipe.

Lean Mean Cheeseburgers

Fulfill your burger cravings with these tasty classic beef burgers with added oats and seasonings.

Full recipe HERE.

Zesty Barbecue Cheeseburgers

Who can resist a juicy Ground Beef burger with extra zip from barbecue sauce?

Click HERE for the full recipe.

Maplewood-Smoked Bacon Beef Burgers

What’s not to love about this recipe? Ground Beef patties are grilled and topped with smoked bacon and cheddar.

Click HERE for the full recipe.

Cheesehead Sliders

Thrill your tailgate crowd with these Wisconsin-inspired winning beer-infused Cheesehead Sliders.

Full recipe HERE.

Celebrate the Kickoff of Football Season with Chef-Approved Beef Recipes

It’s that time of the year: when we patiently wait for the Arizona temps to drop, pumpkin spice is now in every coffee cup, and the Friday night lights kick on along with our favorite teams competing on Sundays. Whether you’re at the stadium tailgating or entertaining at home, nothing brings people together like a little party with a lot of beef. Check out some of our favorite Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. recipes for tailgating season.

Country-Fried Strip Steak Bites with Hot Sauce White Gravy

Celebrity chef Hugh Acheson shares one of his favorite snacks, perfect for an at home tailgate, with this “as seen on GoodMorningAmerica.com” recipe that pairs chicken-fried Strip Steak with a hot sauce gravy.

Check out the full recipe HERE.

Cheesehead Sliders

Thrill your tailgate crowd with these Wisconsin-inspired winning beer-infused Cheesehead Sliders.

Check out the full recipe HERE.

Aloha Beef Sliders

Ground Beef, pineapple, barbecue sauce and red bell pepper create a meal from the islands.

Check out the full recipe HERE.

Nacho Beef Dip

Ground Beef, salsa and cheese dip meet in the skillet for a family favorite recipe. Try this dip with tortilla chips or veggie strips.

Check out the full recipe HERE.

Big Game Fritos® Pie

Wow your Big Game fans with this perfect on-the-go recipe. Ground Beef chili served in a bag of FRITOS® Corn Chips.

Click here for the full recipe HERE.

Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. Celebrates the Fourth of July with Savory Steak Recipes

Denver, CO (June 30, 2022) – Dressing in red, white, and blue and rounding up the sparklers is all part of the fun of Independence Day, but what’s really going to light up the holiday – is steak on the grill. With the holiday falling on a Monday this year, Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner., funded by the Beef Checkoff, is here with ideas for using leftovers from the Fourth for delicious meals to keep the celebration going all week long.

Image courtesy of BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com.

If you’re looking for something light and fresh after a night of watching fireworks, this Grilled Steak and Watermelon Salad recipe makes for the perfect meal. Grilled watermelon, cherry tomatoes, and red onion give it color, but grilled slices of steak from the night before pack this salad with protein. Just toss it together with your favorite dressing and some feta cheese and you instantly have a hassle-free, summertime favorite.

Image courtesy of BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com.

Another mouthwatering meal to make use of those Fourth of July leftovers are these Sirloin Sandwiches with Red Onion Marmalade. A hoagie bun filled with slices of grilled top sirloin steak with creamy goat cheese and homemade red onion marmalade will get your tastebuds booming with flavor.

Image courtesy of BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com.

And to top off the week, this Pesto Steak & Arugula Pizza gives a delectable new take on everyone’s favorite pie. Featuring slices of grilled sirloin steak, pesto, tomatoes and arugula, this pizza aims for new heights when it comes to repurposing a nice, juicy steak.

So, fire up the grill and plan to hang on to those leftovers, because these three recipes are just a few examples of how you can celebrate big.

For more ideas on what to do with leftovers from the Fourth of July, visit BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Sustainability for Kids

Generation Z (ages 9-24) and Generation Alpha (under 12)  are growing quickly and shaping social movements, pop culture, and purchasing habits. It’s important to reach this generation of the next decision-makers early and share with them on the importance of including beef in a healthy, sustainable diet. To do this, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, has developed resources and partnered with leading media among youth. This work has so far included developing games, videos, and graphics on the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner kids sustainability page, plus print and digital articles and interactive quizzes with Scout Life, The Week Jr., Sports Illustrated and Sports Illustrated Kids, Popsugar, and Thrillist.

Beef’s Story Explained:

Games:

Kids on the Ranch:

Videos:

Students Attend Ranch Days Event with Cattlewomen

Life on a cattle ranch is beautiful yet challenging and sharing that experience with others is one of the best ways to show how ranchers care for our land, cattle, and the people who love beef. The Greenlee County Cowbelles and Graham County Cattlewomen recently held an event to do just that, called “Ranch Days.” Fourth-grade teachers were invited to bring their classrooms on either March 10th or the 11th to the Menges Ranch on the historic Black Hills Back Country Byway to learn about how cattle are raised and the importance of beef in their diets. Four school districts signed up, but one was not able to attend due to a bus driver shortage. Almost 300 students spent a day with cattlewomen from the two groups and other volunteers from the Duncan Women’s Club, the Safford Women’s Club, and the Greenlee and Graham Cooperative Extension offices. Bags were provided by the Arizona Beef Council and were filled with educational games and information about beef, as well as a collection of byproduct examples so the students could identify the many items that come from cattle.  

Students learning all about the tools ranchers use on the ranch.

The real fun began on March 10th when the Thatcher and Duncan Elementary students showed up at the Menges ranch. They spent the day with various cattlemen and women as they rotated around to different stations across the ranch. Station One focused on the equipment ranchers use on the ranch, including tack and ropes. The students even had a chance to throw a rope to see if they could catch the calf! Station Two taught the students all about the byproducts that come from cattle. Station Three focused on the different breeds of cattle and the equipment used to work cattle, like chutes and corrals. The students saw what a cow sees when in a chute as they walked through the system. The importance of a squeeze chute, which is used to hold an animal still for various treatments, was also explained.

This water station allows students a chance to build water pathways to get water to other places, much like ranchers do!

Station Four was all about water and how ranchers build water systems to move water to many areas on a ranch. This helps to ensure cattle move around to graze and don’t stay in the same place all the time. It’s also essential for wildlife! Station Five discussed the need for branding, a vital task in Arizona. Students learned how to read a brand and came up with one for themselves. Station Six introduced the students to ranch horses and how they help ranchers do their work. Many of the students had never been close to a horse, so that was exciting. Then they learned about the parts of a horse and the importance of proper care. Station Seven showed how ranchers preserve the history of our state by protecting artifacts and structures left by our ancestors.

For many of the students, this was the first chance they had to get close to a horse!

The students thoroughly enjoyed the day and shared their gratitude in heartfelt and adorable thank you notes. This tour gives teachers and administrators a great incentive to work with ranchers to attend tours because it provides their students a hands-on opportunity to learn about a major industry in Arizona. With many volunteers from the local communities participating, this tour was simple to put together and can be easily replicated in other areas of Arizona.

Many of the wonderful volunteers who made these events possible!

Arizona Beef Iconic Location: The Mountain Oyster Club

The Mountain Oyster Club has a long history in Tucson, Arizona, and is known for its exclusivity with a significant dose of fun and humor. Recently, Tiffany Selchow, Arizona Beef Council, Director of Social Media and Consumer Outreach, sat down with Wendy Davis, current president of the Mountain Oyster Club, and her husband to learn more about its history and how it relates to Arizona Beef.

The standing story of the founding of the Mountain Oyster Club in 1948, informally referred to as the MO Club, is a group of rowdy-type gentlemen who started a club and restaurant that wasn’t quite as stiff as others establishments of the time. The founders wanted to have a place for ranchers to go to feel comfortable in their Levi’s.

Throughout its storied history, the club has had various addresses, starting off in the Santa Rita Hotel basement, then to the Pioneer Hotel, and then in a historic house known as the Jacome home, where the club stayed for 30 years. 2003 saw another move, but this time the club decided they wanted to purchase a building so they wouldn’t have to keep moving.

As is told on the MO Club’s website, “The new home of the Mountain Oyster Club has a long, rich history of its own. It was originally built as a home for Miss Florence L. Pond, daughter of a distinguished lawyer in Detroit. The building, called Stone Ashley, was planned by Grosvernor Atterbury, a well-known New York architect. It was constructed of block and native fieldstone by the M. M. Sundt Construction Company for a price of $67,000. The estate consisted of 318 acres that extended approximately one mile on Speedway and a half-mile along Wilmot. Approximately 20 acres of beautifully landscaped grounds surrounded the 17 room residence, the rest was natural desert. Miss Pond made Stone Ashley and the grounds available to servicemen and other groups in the area during WWII for concerts, other programs, and swimming.

Photo courtesy of the Mountain Oyster Club website (https://mountainoysterclub.com)

In 1947, Miss Pond put the property up for sale with an asking price of $300,000 unfurnished, and eventually sold it for $200,000 including furnishings. After approximately $400,000 in renovations by architect Bernard J. Friedman and the M. I. Poze Construction Company, which included the addition of a third floor to the main building and other building improvements, which would house up to 80 guests, it opened in 1949 as the El Dorado Lodge. Also added at that time, were tennis courts, a heater for the pool, putting greens, badminton courts, shuffleboard courts, horseshoe pitching facilities, an 18 hole golf course, horse stables, corrals, and a residential community.

The El Dorado Guest Lodge promoted itself as a place “…where breathless scenery, age-old traditions and the pleasures of today combine…”

It later became the Palm Court Restaurant before being purchased by Charles Kerr, former maitre d’ of the Tack Room Restaurant and opening as Charles Restaurant in 1979. Charles attempted to return the mansion to its original English manor style with slate floors, wonderful fireplaces, and a beautiful, beamed ceiling. He was also responsible for the addition of a first-class kitchen. What had once been elegant guest rooms were now offices for various Tucson businesses. In 1984, an additional 2 story office building was added to the northeast side of the existing buildings, which copied the style and materials of the original structures.

Most recently, for a period of about 2 years, the original mansion housed a French restaurant that went by the name of the original home, Stone Ashley.

While many changes have taken place over the years, much hasn’t. You still enter the property by way of the tall Italian Cypress lined road and the original paneled front door of the Pond mansion, believed to have cost $1,500 in 1936. A few of the fruit trees remain from what was a family citrus grove of grapefruit, sour orange and olive trees. To the right of the front entrance, the bathhouse with 2 dressing rooms still remains although the pool has been replaced with a parking lot. Many of the decorative gardens, fountains and other exquisite touches that made this estate one of the show places of the southwest can still be found inside and out.”

Photo courtesy of the Mountain Oyster Club website (https://mountainoysterclub.com)

Beef is an obvious staple on the club’s menu, and Sous Chef Mike Estelle, who works with Executive Chef Obie Hindman, filled us in on some of the behind-the-scenes of the restaurant activities. Chef Mike brings a vast portfolio of restaurant knowledge with his career starting in the business as a 15-year-old washing dishes at another long gone, high-end Tucson restaurant called The Tack Room. Chef Mike met the head chef of the MO Club a few months after he started his dishwashing career and now has worked with him for 20 years. The MO Club dry-ages all of their beef in-house, meaning large beef cuts are aged for several weeks to several months before being trimmed and cut into steaks. It’s a process that helps the steak develop flavor and makes it far more tender than it would be completely fresh. Tenderloins are the cut of choice now for the MO Club, and Sous Chef Mike Estelle said they are purchasing a case of them every week and a half. The MO Club also cuts their own steaks from subprimal, and all their hamburger is double ground fresh daily. Veal is another item available that is very popular with club members.

If ever you are invited to join a member of the MO Club for dinner, this is one invite you don’t want to turn down. The club’s character and personality are seen almost everywhere you turn. While pictures are not allowed inside, you will leave with a lifetime of memories and a feeling of having stepped back into an era of finer things but with no lack of humor.

How Agricultural Education & the FFA Support the Agriculture Community

This summer were thrilled to have Kailee Zimmerman as our summer intern. A past Arizona Beef Ambassador and Arizona FFA State Officer, Kailee shares about her FFA experience, and how important FFA is for the agriculture community.


We each probably have a few key childhood memories that stick out. Maybe these memories consist of visiting a favorite place, spending time with family, or experiencing new things. Some of my earliest childhood memories are of playing in my dad’s agriculture classroom during evening FFA chapter meetings and going to the county fair to watch his students show their animals. I can remember how kind the students were to me and I remember how much fun it was to sit in the bleachers and watch the “big kids” show. Family gatherings were also always filled with my aunts, uncles, grandparents, and parents sharing story upon story of their time as FFA members and all of the fun memories they had. From a very young age, I began a countdown to the day when I could be an FFA member and have a blue corduroy jacket of my own.

The National FFA Organization is the largest youth leadership organization in the country with over 735,000 members across all 50 states and over 10,000 FFA members here in Arizona. More than anything, I wanted to be one of these students!


When the time came for me to enter high school and finally have the opportunity to be an FFA member, I was faced with one of the most difficult decisions I ever had to make. I was going to a school that I loved, but it did not have an FFA chapter. I had to decide if I would stay at my school and miss out on FFA or move schools to one with an agriculture program. After lots of consideration and talking to many people, another option was presented! With the help of our principal, my school was able to get an FFA chapter chartered in 2016 when I was a sophomore. This decision and the forethought of my principal truly changed the course of my life.

The first photo of the Trivium FFA Chapter


Because I attended a small charter high school that focused on classical education, my experience in ag class did not look like I had always imagined it would. We did not have a big facility with a large greenhouse, I was the only student in my chapter that had grown up around livestock, and many of my friends had never even heard about the FFA until they joined ag class. Looking back, I am very grateful that my experience was different than I expected it to be because it allowed me to have a unique perspective on the importance of agricultural education.

My parents and me at the Trivium FFA senior banquet.


Most people entered the class having no idea where their food came from and some even had some negative views about agriculture as a whole. However, these were the students that soaked up the lessons and gained the most out of their experience as an FFA member and an agricultural education student. I learned that there is no “one-size-fits-all” description of who should be involved in agriculture and who should be telling our story. We need everyone – no matter their background – to spread the truth about agriculture and to be better consumers. I believe that agricultural education and the FFA play a major role in doing that. My time as a member of the Trivium FFA chapter taught me that everyone has a place in advocating and working in agriculture, we just simply have to help them find it.

My Arizona FFA State Officer team.

Meet Your Rancher: Tim Petersen

While Tim Petersen is a first-generation rancher, ranching wasn’t his first career path. He was raised in Arizona, spending most of his life outdoors hunting, fishing, and camping with his father, who did work as a carpenter on several ranches, and taught his son a love for the outdoors. This love for the land and the outdoors gave Tim a genuine appreciation for those who managed and cared for the landscapes, leading him to his eventual career as a rancher and owner of Arizona Grass Raised Beef Co.

Tim’s career path varied and has included stints in mule training and real estate appraisal, which eventually led him to real estate development. When the great recession hit in 2008, he was at the top of the real estate game with custom home features in high-end magazines across the state of Arizona. However, 2008 would disrupt that success, as it did for many across the country. While this was a crushing blow to many, Tim used it as an opportunity to pivot, learn and grow, deciding he would do something different, which would pull from his diverse background and heritage. His father worked on ranches in northern Arizona, and his grandfather owned three butcher shops in Chicago, meaning the ranching and meat business made sense for Tim.

The ranching and meat businesses are not easy ones to break into, and Tim knew that. He came into the game with the financial knowledge on managing a successful ranch from his appraisal days. To fill in knowledge gaps, Tim took time to work on a friend’s ranch and even worked at the local Bashas’ meat department, where he learned the basics of cleaning the saw blades and other essential equipment care to the more complex requirements. These jobs may seem menial and unimpressive to some, but Tim had a greater goal in mind, and he took it all as a learning experience. The ranch he was working on at the time was leased, and he eventually took over that lease, where he was able to kick off his ranch and beef business. From there, it’s a tale of hard work and ingenuity.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

What started out as a small business that relied on a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspected harvesting facility over 100 miles away has resulted in a more integrated company built piece by piece, from hard work and creative thinking. When Tim started selling his beef directly to consumers, he would haul cattle to the University of Arizona Food Product and Safety Lab. Not long into this business, he located a harvesting facility in Chino Valley, which was ready to sell and, with his business partner, Tim purchased it. This was the best business decision as it allowed him to control the quality of the end beef product and the flow of that product. This harvesting plant is also UDSA inspected, meaning all the beef produced there can be sold anywhere in the USA.

Cattle produce about 60% edible beef, and the rest is bones, fat, tendons, etc. Tim doesn’t like to see anything go to waste, as many harvesting plants don’t, so he was keen on figuring out what to do with all the extra byproducts. His business partner is health-conscious and suggested they start producing bone broth. Bone broth is nutrient-dense, providing vitamins, minerals, and collagen. Those who are focused on their physical health find it very beneficial. Tim found a commercial kitchen to execute this idea where they eventually started to also make beef and other animal tallow (fat) which is used by restaurants. Pet treats are made from the lungs and other organs. Beef jerky is made from cuts that might not have the marbling needed for a steak or roast but is a better product in jerky form. Ground beef is a popular product, but as anyone who has raised a steer for harvest knows, there is always a lot of ground beef. So, Tim is currently developing a beef jerky that uses ground beef, ensuring that the product is used and not wasted.

Timing seems to be Tim’s best skill, as they launched an aggressive online business about two years ago, right before the COVID pandemic hit. When consumers were unsure about the reliability of their food supply, Tim and his company could keep harvesting cattle, producing beef, and selling it to people around the country. Tim reports that about 80% of his business is now done online. His product is also distributed by well-known foodservice companies such as Shamrock, Sysco, Peddler’s Son, and Custom Foods.

Tim supports the entire beef community and says, “American ranchers and feeders are raising some of the healthiest beef we’ve ever raised.” He’s found a niche in the grass-finished world of beef, and he has done everything he can to ensure the entire animal is used to the best and highest use. Grass-finished beef is a small portion of the overall beef product in the US, but there is a demand for it, and Tim is happy to fill it. Overall, Tim is a businessman who cares about what he sells to his customers. He is always willing to find a solution to a problem and find a niche to fulfill. Tim often says, “The market never lies,” and he’s proven that time and again with his current business and career path.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

Advocating in Our Own Way

This summer we are thrilled to have Kailee Zimmerman as our summer intern. A past Arizona Beef Ambassador and Arizona FFA State Officer, Kailee shares about her roots, and how she continues to share about the beef community.


A recent study by the American Farm Bureau Federation showed that the average American is now at least three generations removed from production agriculture.  Rapid population increase and urbanization has left just two percent of United States citizens actively involved in raising, growing, and producing food.  We find ourselves in the middle of a reality that we have never faced before – the fact that American farmers & ranchers and consumers are divided by a large gap of knowledge and understanding. 

Whew!  Now is the time when we can take a deep breath!  While these statistics may seem daunting, there is great hope!  We also live in a world where many people are more interested than ever about their food and where it comes from.  We see foods marketed as “farm to table” and “locally grown” becoming more popular.  In order to bridge the knowledge gap between food producers and food consumers, it is so important for agriculturalists to share their story!

Picture of the Weathersby Ranch where my Nana grew up. This photo was used in the Arizona Highways magazine in 1957.

I believe that the story of American agriculture (especially, the beef community!) is one of triumph and inspiration.  Why wouldn’t we want to share it?  I am blessed to come from a family with ranching roots.  My Nana grew up on a ranch in Southeastern Arizona in the Aravaipa Canyon.  As a little kid, I loved hearing stories about the ranch and the adventures my family would have there.  However, as I have gotten older, through these stories and experiences, I have also grown a deep appreciation for the work that goes into raising cattle that will produce nutritious, sustainable protein.  I am also grateful for the example of hard work, integrity and perseverance that my Nana and other family members on the ranch set for me.


2T Ranch Show Team at 2019 Maricopa County Fair

While I did not grow up on a ranch like my Nana, I am grateful to have experienced a small degree of what it is like to raise cattle and provide food for families by raising and exhibiting show cattle.  I have raised market steers since I was 11 years old and have shown them at countless jackpot shows and fairs across Arizona.  It is hard for me to list all of the lessons that I learned from raising livestock and showing cattle, but one of the most important things I learned was how important it is to be a good representative of the agricultural community.  When we first started showing, my parents taught my brothers and me about the importance of being advocates for agriculture as we interacted with community members and visitors at the fairs we attended.  Though it was routine for us to care for our cattle and get them ready to show, this was very foreign to many people who attended the fairs.

My Nana’s Younger Brother, Jake, on the ranch.

Throughout my time exhibiting cattle, I was able to have many conversations with people who were unfamiliar with agriculture and knew very little about where their food came from.  I loved getting to talk to them and help give a little more understanding about what farmers and ranchers do to provide us with a safe, healthy and abundant food supply.


Kailee & Steer, “Switch”, and the Maricopa County Fair.

These experiences taught me that we each play an important role in advocating for agriculture – even if it feels like our part is small.  I hope that the conversations I had left an impact on the people I spoke with.  We each just have to be willing to share our story with those around us.  As we share our experiences with kindness, people are more likely to listen and respect what we are sharing and, in turn, we are better able to understand their perspectives and experiences.

“Nana” (Mary Smith) Showing Polled Herefords from the ranch.

Though there are challenges facing the agriculture community today, there are also great successes and innovations like we have never seen before.  The future is so bright!  We each just have to do our part and share our story when we are given the opportunity.