Meet Your Rancher: Angie Newbold

Raising cattle is what we would call an active job. You don’t sit a whole lot, unless you consider riding horses a form of sitting, and on the rare occasion, it sometimes involves unintentional running. But some ranchers choose to run for fun. Yup, we said it: run for fun. It’s a crazy thought, we know, but one that Angie Newbold, Arizona beef rancher, embraces.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

An active, healthy lifestyle is one that Angie and her husband Cole have always embraced, and, with their current occupations, this goal has mostly worked itself out. Angie and Cole Newbold are both first generation ranchers, meaning they are the first in their family to work on cattle ranches. This couple currently resides and works on the M-K Ranch owned by Oddonetto Family north of Globe, Arizona, where they help to raise registered Santa Gertrudis (purebred breed of cattle who are recorded in a registry) and commercial (cross bred cattle who are not registered) cattle. Cole is the full-time cowboy at the ranch while Angie works in town during the week and helps on weekends and on other busy days at the ranch.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

While ranch life is active, a town job isn’t. As an active child, Angie could be found team roping daily, practicing for swim team, along with any number of other outdoor activities so it only makes sense she picked up another physical activity as an adult when life required more sitting. Running was her activity of choice, outside of ranching, because it’s a free sport that you can basically do anywhere and anytime you choose. With miles of dirt roads surrounding the ranch, it’s a logical option to expend energy she builds up from her office job.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

For her husband Cole, living and working on the ranch gives him plenty of opportunities for physical activity as the work is never done. Just like all cattlemen and women, Cole and Angie, and the owners of the M-K Ranch, care about the cattle in their care and about the land they use to raise those animals. Just like how Angie is focused on keeping herself healthy, also of importance is keeping the land healthy. This is done in many ways such as pasture rotation, water development, and picking the right breed of cattle for the land. One example is the implementation of the registered herd of Santa Gertrudis cattle. These animals are known for their hardiness, meaning they can do well in hot, dry climates, such as that around Globe. They require less resources than other breeds might.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

While Angie might not run with a local running club like many who live in town, she does have an avid group of running companions. These members of her running club all have four legs and bark more than they speak but are the perfect companions on the back roads as they offer some entertainment and protection. Angie jokes that the president of her running club is Josie, a small Cairn Terrier. These dogs not only run with Angie but also work on the ranch to help with gathering cattle which, in many circumstances, can relieve pressure on the cowboys and horses.

Josie, a small Cairn Terrier, is the president of Angie’s running club! Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

Cole, Angie’s husband, was a runner in high school and helped encourage Angie to start running. “He said, just try a 5k and see if you like it,” reports Angie who then mentions it was all down hill (or uphill, depending on the course) from there. Being a competitive person, Angie couldn’t stop there and has three marathon finishes to date with goals of more. She has recently discovered trail running and is actively competing in races around the state of Arizona. With a busy schedule at work and on the ranch, adding training runs into her schedule can be challenging but Angie states it’s a good mental break. In addition to multiple runs a week, Angie cross trains with weights on a regular basis and tries to stick to a healthy, balanced diet. Her fuel of choice includes lean beef, pinto beans, and fresh veggies and fruit, along with eggs and whole milk.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

When asked for her advice on staying active with running, Angie emphasizes cross training, whether that is with weights or ranch work, if you have that option. Angie’s favorite distance to run is 6 miles because it serves as a great way to stay in shape and offers her a mental break from her office job and from recording cattle information such as birthdate, location, health records, progeny reports. The power of rewards is an important part of training too. After every race, Angie always has a good old fashion cheeseburger with all the trimmings and the good cheese. A big side of fries is always welcome! She says that during training her go-to beef meals are fajitas and pasta with meat sauce. Both are easy, filling, and packed full of the nutrients her body needs to get her down the back roads and back home.

This blog post is made possible by the generous support of the Arizona Cattle Industry Research and Education Foundation.

College Student Approved Recipe: Easy Roast Beef Potluck Rolls

This blog post was written by our 2019 Senior Arizona Beef Ambassador Savannah Burt. Arizona Beef Ambassadors are passionate youth advocates for the Arizona beef industry. The winners are the official youth representatives of the Arizona State Cowbelles (ASC) and the beef community. The senior winner travels the state sharing the story of beef from pasture to plate with consumers and students. Savannah is a current college student and explains below how an easy-to-cook-and-prepare recipe is a must for her.


As a busy college student who also lives in a dorm, most of my meals must meet certain criteria. First, it has to be easy to make. Second, it must be inexpensive. Finally, it must be portable. Luckily, this recipe meets every single requirement, and it centers around my favorite source of protein: beef! These roast beef potluck rolls were originally featured on BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com, and they’re as nutritious as they are delicious! The recipe makes 12 servings, each with 21 grams of protein, so it’s perfect for storing in the fridge and eating over a few days or bringing to gatherings with friends or family! Without any further ado, here’s the recipe for roast beef potluck rolls, complete with some tips and tricks from the last time I made it.

Ingredients:
1 pound thinly sliced reduced-sodium deli roast beef
1 package Hawaiian rolls (12 count)
1/4 cup cream-style prepared horseradish
6 slices reduced-fat provolone cheese
1/3 cup butter, melted
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon dried parsley leaves
2 teaspoons packed light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon onion powder

Cooking:

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Coat 9 x 13-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Cut rolls in half, horizontally.

Place the bottom half of the rolls in the baking dish. Spread horseradish on the cut side, and top with roast beef and cheese. Close the sandwiches with the other half of the rolls.

Use a paring knife to cut the rolls into 12 sandwiches. Use your hands to spread the sandwiches apart.

Mix together butter, Worcestershire sauce, parsley, sugar, and onion powder in a small bowl. Pour the mixture evenly over the sandwiches. Take a spoon and spread the mixture over the top of the rolls.

Make sure they’re all generously coated! Cover the dish and refrigerate 1 hour to overnight.

Bake the sandwiches, uncovered, in the 350°F oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and the rolls are golden brown.

Once the sandwiches are out of the oven, you can combine them with a nice salad or side dish for a mouthwatering meal! The possibilities are endless, and this savory recipe is at the top of my favorites list!

To learn more about the Arizona Beef Ambassador and the program visit the Arizona State Cowbelles’ website here.

HIIT for Heart

This post was written by Celia Dubauskas. Celia is an undergraduate student at Arizona State University, studying Nutrition Communication. This spring, she has been an intern for Arizona Beef Council, creating written and social content for our platforms. Celia is an experienced fitness professional and is certified as a personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Her passion for fitness has fueled her interest in nutrition and learning more about health and diet culture.

Did you know the American Heart Association certifies eight cuts of beef as part of a heart-healthy diet? Give Celia’s HIIT for Heart workout a try and then refuel with some delicious and nutritious beef to get that strong, healthy heart you’ve always wanted (and need!).

There is no doubt that exercise is good for both our physical health and mental well-being.  Consistent exercise routines create habit and intention, increasing our cardiovascular health and ensuring proper dopamine levels. We set goals, and when we achieve them, we grow in confidence and strength.  Exercise makes us happy! 

So why don’t we do more?

One of the biggest challenges we face today is time.  Never have Americans been so busy.  We all get 24 hours in a day, but how we choose to spend that time varies person to person.  To many, it seems impossible to reach their fitness goals because there is no time to get to the gym or squeeze in a workout.  Some do not have the financial means to have a gym membership or invest in equipment. 

What if all you needed was to move your body for 20 minutes?  Can you make the time?  Sure you can!

Surely, it cannot be that easy.  But yes, it can! Interval training is the latest and greatest fitness trend.  By rapidly increasing your heart rate with a quick rest in between each exercise, you can burn more calories than a traditional weight and cardio session combined.  HIIT training has been proven to blast fat and improve heart health.

All you need is 20 minutes.

Here is a quick 20 minute HIIT workout you can do in the comfort of your own home or outside in the sun.  These five exercises will be performed for 30 seconds followed by a 30 second rest.  Repeat 4 times and there is your 20-minute fat-blasting workout.

Jumping Squats

Butt Kickers

Jumping Lunges

Push Ups

Mountain Climbers

30 Second Exercise

30 Second Rest

5 Exercises

Repeat 4x

Nourish your body with movement, and respect it for all that it allows you to do!  HIIT for happiness and HIIT for heart!

Monique Machiz: Best of Our Valley

Over the past decade, there has been a nationwide focal shift towards health and wellness.  Never has there been such a demand for fitness and nutrition services in the Phoenix valley and state of Arizona.  There are hundreds of health and fitness professionals across the state, but today I talked to Monique Machiz about her journey as a fitness professional and how she came to be voted the 2019 Best Trainer by Arizona Foothills Magazine “Best of Our Valley” contest.

Monique is a personal trainer for Tytin Fitness in Tempe, Arizona.  She works out of the wellness center she and her fiancé, Ty Mealey, opened in 2018: Arizona Aesthetics & Wellness.  Their personal training business was originally planted in a small Scottsdale studio, under the name Tytin Fitness in 2016.  The business grew so fast in just two years that the couple wanted to open a bigger second location for their personal training and other health and fitness services to call home.

 “We wanted to open a one-stop-shop for health and fitness.  AZA&W hosts Tytin Fitness personal training, as well as various medical and athletic recovery services.  Clients can come for a training session, followed by an adjustment with Dr. Cory Baker, our chiropractor, or increase the intensity of their training with Wesley Kress’s Breakthrough Performance & Rehab.  Those are just a few of our services.  In the future we would like to house physical therapists, aestheticians, and so many more!”

With the success that Monique has had over the last few years, I wanted to learn more about her professional journey and what got her into the fitness industry.  Monique had played sports her entire life.  She played basketball all the way into college.  After suffering an injury, she was forced to learn different ways to work out.  She began to do a lot of research about exercise and nutrition, and she even put together women’s workout groups at her school to teach her friends how to workout, as well.

After graduating from Whittier College with a B.S. in Kinesiology, Monique obtained her Personal Training Certification because, like many recent graduates, she was not sure exactly what she wanted to do: “I just knew I wanted to help people.”  She began personal training at a corporate gym and instantly fell in love.  She was able to teach people about health and fitness and pursue her passion at the same time.

With seven years of certified personal training, I was excited to hear a bit about Monique’s training and nutrition philosophy. 

“When it comes to nutrition, people tend to under eat.  There are so many preconceived notions that carbohydrates are the enemy and that you should eat low fat.  Food is 80% of the results we make in the gym.  Food is our friend.  Finding that overall balanced lifestyle is so important for my clients.  I try to stress an 80/20 approach.  It is important to be eating clean, whole foods most of the time, but food is also meant to be enjoyed.”

For her own personal diet, Monique likes to follow a higher fat approach.  “I have an endomorphic body type, so I perform well on a higher fat diet.  Beef is one of the predominant meats that I eat.  I have an easier time building muscle when I incorporate red meat into my diet.”  Not only does Monique train for overall health, she also competes in figure competitions.  She stressed to me the importance of nutrient timing and why she loves red meat for workout recovery.  “When it comes to making a meal plan, I love putting red meat post-workout.  Red meat is slower digesting, and because of the micronutrients and high creatine content, red meat can be awesome for recovery and for rebuilding the muscle.” While old-school bodybuilders tend to stress lean meats and fish, Monique believes red meat is a great food to incorporate in the diet without having to take a bunch of supplements.

Monique loves the bodybuilding style of training, as it is one of her hobbies, amidst her busy schedule.  But she understands most people are interested in fitness to lead a healthy lifestyle.  For many of her clients, she incorporates bodybuilding movements with a functional style of training. “I mix a little bit of both styles into my training. We need to make sure the body is moving well and functional for the client’s lifestyle.” 

To wrap up our interview, I asked Monique what she thinks the general public should know when navigating health and fitness: “Find what works for you.  It’s all about trial and error.  Try something and give it a month.  Don’t be afraid to mix things up, and don’t be afraid to research what you’re putting into your body.  Just because someone says something is healthy doesn’t mean it is.  Fitness is not a one-size-its-all.” 

To learn more about Monique Machiz, you can visit her social media and the Arizona Aesthetics & Wellness website.

Arizona Aesthetics & Wellness

Instagram: Monique Machiz


This post was written by Celia Dubauskas. Celia is an undergraduate student at Arizona State University, studying Nutrition Communication. This spring, she has been an intern for Arizona Beef Council, creating written and social content for our platforms. Celia is an experienced fitness professional and is certified as a personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Her passion for fitness has fueled her interest in nutrition and learning more about health and diet culture. Keep on eye out for upcoming posts!

Leaning Towards Leaner

It is not a surprise to hear that dietary preferences are changing towards leaner meats. With more and more information available regarding health and nutrition, consumers have become more concerned with their health and what they consume. While it is easy to recognize changes in product development with labels shouting “fat free,” “zero-sugar added,” and “low calorie food,” we do not usually think about how farming and ranching techniques have changed over time to meet demands for “healthier” options. How are ranchers and growers keeping up with the demand?

Leaning Out

The 1980’s saw a shift in focus towards nutrition and diet in America. In 1977, the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs recommended a reduction in consumption of high fat foods and animal fat. In 1980, the first Dietary Guidelines for Americans was published, sparking many changes in the consumer marketplace. The National Consumer Retail Beef Study was funded by members of the beef community in 1986 to address consumer issues with beef. The study established that the change in consumer preference towards leaner cuts was driven by dietary recommendations and increased nutritional knowledge.

In 1988, the Beef Checkoff Program was created. This program collects $1 per head on the sale of live cattle, then the Beef Checkoff funds research and education. The first major research design funded by the National Beef Checkoff Program was the National Beef Market Basket Survey. This study brought industry leaders to the realization that most animal fat was being removed at the processing level, due to consumer demand. For this reason, efforts were made to reduce fat produced to reduce overall waste while maintaining high quality, taste and tenderness. The Value-Based Marketing Task Force then initiated a “War on Fat” campaign to reduce excess fat produced.

Production Changes

To reduce the production of fat while maintaining high quality beef, farmers and ranchers worked to produce leaner animals. Leaner beef results primarily from a change in breeding and feeding practices. Cattle are bred to enhance desirable traits, such as leaner animals. Feeding practices have improved due to research on ration and nutrition to optimize cattle health. While much of lean beef relies on specific genetics and raising of cattle, farmers and ranchers commit to and care for their land, stewardship practices that ensure sustainability for the land, and their cattle.

Photo by Roxanne Knight

Leaner beef results primarily from a change in breeding and feeding practices.

Lean Beef Options

A 3.5 ounce serving of beef qualifies as “lean” by the USDA, if it contains:

  • 4.5 grams of less of saturated fat
  • 10 grams or less of total fat
  • less than 95 mg of cholesterol

There are many cuts of beef that qualify as lean, including 17 of the 25 most popular cuts of beef, like Top Sirloin, Skirt Steak, and the Tenderloin.

Many lean cuts of beef are the most popular like the Top Sirloin, Skirt Steak, and the Tenderloin.

Naturally nutrient-rich, beef is an optimal choice for protein because it contains all nine essential amino-acids. Because the human body cannot make these building blocks, they must be obtained from another source: protein. Registered Dietitian Caitlin Mondellli says, “Beef is a healthy protein source that can fit into an everyday diet. We tend to think of beef in a high calorie context, but more than 60% of retail cuts are considered lean.” Cailtin adds cuts of beef into her diet weekly. Suggesting that consumers balance their plates with grains and vegetables, “I select leaner cuts, so I can add cheese or other fat sources to my plate. All cuts of meat can fit, you just have to create that balance.” With so many lean beef options, consumers do not have to sacrifice delicious to live a leaner life.


This post was written by Celia Dubauskas. Celia is an undergraduate student at Arizona State University, studying Nutrition Communication. This spring, she has been an intern for Arizona Beef Council, creating written and social content for our platforms. Celia is an experienced fitness professional and is certified as a personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Her passion for fitness has fueled her interest in nutrition and learning more about health and diet culture. Keep on eye out for upcoming posts!