Arizona Beef Council participates in new Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. grilling campaign celebrating America’s favorite protein pastime.

July 3, 2020- – The Arizona Beef Council is partnering with  Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner., funded by the Beef Checkoff, to launch “United We Steak,” a new summer grilling campaign showcasing 50 steaks and all 50 states.

“United We Steak” celebrates not only a shared tradition of grilling delicious steaks, but also what makes each state unique when it comes to this beloved pastime. The idea comes to life at UnitedWeSteak.com with an interactive map of the United States made from 50 hand-cut state-shaped steaks. The interactive map is packed full of grilling spirit, state-specific recipes and fun facts that can help consumers nationwide “beef up” grilling season this summer.   

Arizona as a cut of beef!

Underpinning the campaign is a recognition that across all 50 states, there is a universal love of beef sizzling on a summer grill. According to research conducted by Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner., which is managed by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, nearly one-third of consumers say that they plan to grill more this summer than they have in the past.[i]  

A delicious fajita recipe is featured on the Arizona page.

While every state has special traditions and recipes when it comes to grilling beef, some of those unique to Arizona, and featured on UnitedWeSteak.com include:

“There’s nothing like the sound and smell of beef sizzling on the grill during the summer grilling season,” said Clint Gladden, Chairman of the Arizona Beef Council. “United We Steak’ not only celebrates a love for grilling that brings families together, but also the beef farmers and ranchers who work hard every day to keep beef on grills all summer long.”

Each state page also features a story about a rancher. On Arizona’s page, we feature Joe and Sarah King.

As part of the campaign, the state and U.S.-shaped steaks will be featured in national advertisements, including still images and videos that will be shared on digital and social media platforms. The advertisements will also be shared on video platforms including YouTube and Connected TV in an effort to inspire Americans to grill up their favorite beef meal no matter where they live. Arizona is getting in on the fun too with localized advertisements that will reach proud Arizona grill masters.

The campaign follows the kickoff of summer grilling season, which Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. marked with a new video released Memorial Day Weekend showcasing the dedication of farmers and ranchers to raising safe, sustainable and nutritious beef. It concludes with the simple declaration: “Summer Grilling Season Brought To You By Beef Farmers and Ranchers.”

The original sponsors of summer grilling are ranchers raising delicious, nutritious, and safe beef!

More beef grilling inspiration and information can be found at United We Steak and BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

About the Beef Checkoff
The Beef Checkoff Program was established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. The checkoff assesses $1 per head on the sale of live domestic and imported cattle, in addition to a comparable assessment on imported beef and beef products. States may retain up to 50 cents on the dollar and forward the other 50 cents per head to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board, which administers the national checkoff program, subject to USDA approval.


[i] Grilling Survey, April 2020

What is stockmanship?

Stockmanship is how ranchers interact with their animals with a focus on keeping the stress meter low for both the handler and the animal. Most cattle start their life cycle on ranches in large pastures. Here in Arizona, most cows calve alone and don’t usually need human assistance, but ranchers do interact with their cattle regularly. To raise high-quality beef, cattle must be healthy, and ranchers can help their animals achieve that goal with a vaccination program. Vaccinating, along with branding and other activities, does require ranchers to work closely with their animals and good stockmanship can help make it easier on both the cows and the people.

Dr. Dean Fish of the Sante Fe Ranch Foundation and Anchor F Cattle Company is shown moving cattle on horseback which can be a low-stress method when used correctly.

Ranchers don’t put a leash on their cattle to move them like one might a dog. Rather, cattlemen and women use their bodies (and horses) positioned in certain ways to move cattle where we need them to go. To understand this concept better, we first must know a few things about cows. Cattle are prey animals, meaning they want to gather in herds because that gives them more protection from predators. They also have a flight or fight instinct and tend to run if they are frightened. Some breeds of cattle are more inclined to fight if put into a sticky situation, like if a predator tries to attack a cow’s calf. Secondly, they don’t often move in straight lines, but rather in circular patterns. Knowing these two instincts tells us how we can work with cattle to decrease stress on the animal and to increase productivity.

Cattle flight zones can vary greatly and depend primarily on breed, environmental factors, and the amount of exposure they’ve had to humans. Micaela McGibbon of the Santa Rita Ranch demonstrates a flight zone that is relatively small because these cattle are used to interactions with Micaela in this circumstance.

Think about a large invisible ring around a cow. This is her flight zone. Depending on breed and how much human interaction this cow has had, her flight zone might be small or large. Pressure can be applied by stepping into their circular flight zone, in a certain area to encourage her to move forwards, backwards, away, or even towards you. Also knowing how much pressure to apply, meaning how far and how fast you must walk into the flight zone, is critical. If an animal looks at you or maybe flicks an ear towards you but doesn’t move it probably means you have to step a little closer. But on the opposite end of the spectrum, if an animal jumps and runs away you might have walked too far into her flight zone or approached too quickly.

This graphic shows how the flight zone works. When you move towards the head of an animal they are going to turn away, while moving towards the back of the animal will move them forward. The point of balance, which is generally at their shoulder, is the point in which those movements change. Stepping into the flight zone will cause an animal to move while stepping out of the flight zone will cause it to stop moving because of the pressure you are putting on the animal. Image courtesy of the Beef Quality Assurance Program.

Working with these natural flight zones and movement patterns help to decrease stress on animals while increasing productivity. The less stress an animal experiences, the better, so they can put their energy toward making healthy beef. It also makes it safer for the human involved to utilize these skills as the animal is less likely to tap into their fight response.

The Beef Lifecycle

The journey of raising beef is among the most complex of any food. Due in part to their changing nutritional needs throughout their lifetime, beef cattle often times will change hands and ownership up to three or four times, over the course of one and a half to three years, as they move through their various life stages.

Across this process, however, one important thing remains constant – and that’s the beef community’s shared commitment to raising cattle in a safe, humane and environmentally sustainable way. Working together, each segment of the beef lifecycle aims to make the best use of vital natural resources like land, water and energy – not just for today, but also for the future. The result is a delicious and nutritious food you can feel good about serving your family and friends.

Let’s explore how beef gets from pasture to plate in Arizona.

Ranch:

Raising beef begins with ranchers who maintain a herd of cows that give birth to calves once a year. When a calf is born, it typically weighs 60 to 100 pounds. Over the next few months, each calf will live off its mother’s milk and graze on forages from the rangeland. Ranches in Arizona are typically large in land area because of our dry, arid climate. Ranchers are committed to caring for their animals and the land on which they are raised.

Photo by Roxanne Knight.

Weaning:

Calves are weaned from their mother’s milk at 6 to 10 months of age when they weigh between 450 and 700 pounds. This can be done several ways with one option called fence line weaning. This means the cows are on one side of the fence and the mother cows are on the other side. They aren’t able to nurse but can still be closer to the cow, making it a less stressful situation. These calves continue to graze on pastures and may begin receiving a small amount of supplemental plant-based feed for extra energy and protein to help them grow and thrive.

Stocking and Backgrounders:

After weaning, cattle continue to grow and thrive by grazing on grass, forage and other plants with ranchers providing supplemental feed including vitamins and minerals to meet all of their nutritional needs.

Photo courtesy of Willcox Livestock Auction.

Livestock Auction Markets:

After weaning and/or during the stocker and backgrounder phase, cattle may be sold at livestock auction markets.

Photo by Anna Aja.

Feedyard:

Mature cattle are often moved to feedyards. Here cattle typically spend 4 to 6 months. They are free to graze at feed bunks containing a carefully balanced diet made up of roughage (such as hay and grass), grain (such as corn, wheat and soybean meal) and local renewable feed sources. Veterinarians, nutritionists and pen riders work together to provide individual care for each animal.

Learn more about animal safety and care at the feedyard.

PACKING PLANT:

Once cattle reach market weight (typically 1,200 to 1,400 pounds at 18 to 22 months of age), they are sent to a packing plant (also called a processing facility). United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspectors oversee the implementation of safety, animal welfare and quality standards from the time animals enter the plant until the final beef products are shipped to grocery stores and restaurants.

Arizona beef lifecycle with Arizona rancher, Dean Fish.

Most Arizona ranches cover many, many acres because of our environment here in the southwest. Our climate is arid, meaning relatively dry, so grass and forages, along with plentiful water, is challenging to maintain at times. However, this does not mean high-quality cattle can’t be raised here! By managing the land, we can ensure there are enough resources for the cattle, the wildlife, and the public who also enjoy these open spaces.

A scence from the ZZ Cattle Co. ranch.

Range management is a science which focuses on the study of rangelands and the conservation and sustainable management of these arid spaces for the benefit of current and future generations. It is the goal of the caretakers of these lands to use the resources provided, such as water, grass, and forages, to grow a high-quality product such as beef, while also maintaining a healthy ecosystem in which wildlife, flora and fauna can flourish. Proper management is key as these lands have previously been used for many generations to grow food and it is the goal of the ranchers to see their continued responsible use into the future. 

Andrew McGibbon of the Santa Rita Ranch in Green Valley, Arizona (check out the blog we wrote about his family here) explains that on his ranch they work to adapt the cattle to the environment and to rainfall amounts. One method of adaptation that is used on his ranch is called rotational grazing which means cattle are consistently moved through various pastures. In the summertime, the cattle are moved through pastures rather quickly, meaning the herd is gathered and moved to a new pasture every 10-12 days. This is done during the monsoon months of July, August and September, to protect the quickly growing grass. In the wintertime, grasses typically go dormant, which means the cattle can spend a longer amount of time in each pasture. Movement through pastures is also dependent on the amount of rainfall in that area of the ranch.

Pictured are Andrew, Micaela and Liam McGibbon with some of their cows.

As with most businesses, things are always done a little differently from ranch to ranch. Dan Bell of the ZZ Cattle Company in Nogales, Arizona (to learn more about Dan and his ranch visit this blog post) explains that range management is used across their entire ranch to ensure that cattle have fresh grass throughout the year. This allows the pastures to rest after cattle have grazed. Pastures are rested on an alternating season of use pattern. This gives the grass more time to rest and set seed, allowing for growth in the next cycle. This is especially helpful through times of drought, ensuring there is grass waiting in other areas, allowing for efficient management and use of the resource.

Range management is also important for the wildlife who cohabitate with cattle on these pasture lands. Ranchers are acutely aware of water sources and how they are used. A large pasture can be grazed more efficiently and effectively by providing water in various areas, encouraging cattle movement and equitable grazing. This allows cattle and wildlife to graze in more remote areas which were not close to a water source before but now are by adding a trough for water and a pipeline to get the water there.

It’s also important to monitor and work to improve the rangeland used by ranchers. This is done by a practice called rangeland monitoring which means we document and measure how conditions of the land are changing in response to the environment and the management practices which are in use. It helps guide ranchers to know if their current range management plan is working and how to adapt to changing circumstances such as drought. Add this tool to the rancher’s toolbox to ensure they reach their goal of seeing the land they currently raise cattle on continue to happen to see the same for generations to come.  

Special thanks to the McGibbons, Dan Bell, and Mario Preciado of the Arizona State Land Department for assistance with this blog post.

Meet Your Rancher: Angie Newbold

Raising cattle is what we would call an active job. You don’t sit a whole lot, unless you consider riding horses a form of sitting, and on the rare occasion, it sometimes involves unintentional running. But some ranchers choose to run for fun. Yup, we said it: run for fun. It’s a crazy thought, we know, but one that Angie Newbold, Arizona beef rancher, embraces.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

An active, healthy lifestyle is one that Angie and her husband Cole have always embraced, and, with their current occupations, this goal has mostly worked itself out. Angie and Cole Newbold are both first generation ranchers, meaning they are the first in their family to work on cattle ranches. This couple currently resides and works on the M-K Ranch owned by Oddonetto Family north of Globe, Arizona, where they help to raise registered Santa Gertrudis (purebred breed of cattle who are recorded in a registry) and commercial (cross bred cattle who are not registered) cattle. Cole is the full-time cowboy at the ranch while Angie works in town during the week and helps on weekends and on other busy days at the ranch.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

While ranch life is active, a town job isn’t. As an active child, Angie could be found team roping daily, practicing for swim team, along with any number of other outdoor activities so it only makes sense she picked up another physical activity as an adult when life required more sitting. Running was her activity of choice, outside of ranching, because it’s a free sport that you can basically do anywhere and anytime you choose. With miles of dirt roads surrounding the ranch, it’s a logical option to expend energy she builds up from her office job.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

For her husband Cole, living and working on the ranch gives him plenty of opportunities for physical activity as the work is never done. Just like all cattlemen and women, Cole and Angie, and the owners of the M-K Ranch, care about the cattle in their care and about the land they use to raise those animals. Just like how Angie is focused on keeping herself healthy, also of importance is keeping the land healthy. This is done in many ways such as pasture rotation, water development, and picking the right breed of cattle for the land. One example is the implementation of the registered herd of Santa Gertrudis cattle. These animals are known for their hardiness, meaning they can do well in hot, dry climates, such as that around Globe. They require less resources than other breeds might.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

While Angie might not run with a local running club like many who live in town, she does have an avid group of running companions. These members of her running club all have four legs and bark more than they speak but are the perfect companions on the back roads as they offer some entertainment and protection. Angie jokes that the president of her running club is Josie, a small Cairn Terrier. These dogs not only run with Angie but also work on the ranch to help with gathering cattle which, in many circumstances, can relieve pressure on the cowboys and horses.

Josie, a small Cairn Terrier, is the president of Angie’s running club! Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

Cole, Angie’s husband, was a runner in high school and helped encourage Angie to start running. “He said, just try a 5k and see if you like it,” reports Angie who then mentions it was all down hill (or uphill, depending on the course) from there. Being a competitive person, Angie couldn’t stop there and has three marathon finishes to date with goals of more. She has recently discovered trail running and is actively competing in races around the state of Arizona. With a busy schedule at work and on the ranch, adding training runs into her schedule can be challenging but Angie states it’s a good mental break. In addition to multiple runs a week, Angie cross trains with weights on a regular basis and tries to stick to a healthy, balanced diet. Her fuel of choice includes lean beef, pinto beans, and fresh veggies and fruit, along with eggs and whole milk.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography.

When asked for her advice on staying active with running, Angie emphasizes cross training, whether that is with weights or ranch work, if you have that option. Angie’s favorite distance to run is 6 miles because it serves as a great way to stay in shape and offers her a mental break from her office job and from recording cattle information such as birthdate, location, health records, progeny reports. The power of rewards is an important part of training too. After every race, Angie always has a good old fashion cheeseburger with all the trimmings and the good cheese. A big side of fries is always welcome! She says that during training her go-to beef meals are fajitas and pasta with meat sauce. Both are easy, filling, and packed full of the nutrients her body needs to get her down the back roads and back home.

This blog post is made possible by the generous support of the Arizona Cattle Industry Research and Education Foundation.

This blog post was written by our 2019 Senior Arizona Beef Ambassador Savannah Burt. Arizona Beef Ambassadors are passionate youth advocates for the Arizona beef industry. The winners are the official youth representatives of the Arizona State Cowbelles (ASC) and the beef community. The senior winner travels the state sharing the story of beef from pasture to plate with consumers and students. Savannah is a current college student and explains below how an easy-to-cook-and-prepare recipe is a must for her.


As a busy college student who also lives in a dorm, most of my meals must meet certain criteria. First, it has to be easy to make. Second, it must be inexpensive. Finally, it must be portable. Luckily, this recipe meets every single requirement, and it centers around my favorite source of protein: beef! These roast beef potluck rolls were originally featured on BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com, and they’re as nutritious as they are delicious! The recipe makes 12 servings, each with 21 grams of protein, so it’s perfect for storing in the fridge and eating over a few days or bringing to gatherings with friends or family! Without any further ado, here’s the recipe for roast beef potluck rolls, complete with some tips and tricks from the last time I made it.

Ingredients:
1 pound thinly sliced reduced-sodium deli roast beef
1 package Hawaiian rolls (12 count)
1/4 cup cream-style prepared horseradish
6 slices reduced-fat provolone cheese
1/3 cup butter, melted
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon dried parsley leaves
2 teaspoons packed light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon onion powder

Cooking:

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Coat 9 x 13-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Cut rolls in half, horizontally.

Place the bottom half of the rolls in the baking dish. Spread horseradish on the cut side, and top with roast beef and cheese. Close the sandwiches with the other half of the rolls.

Use a paring knife to cut the rolls into 12 sandwiches. Use your hands to spread the sandwiches apart.

Mix together butter, Worcestershire sauce, parsley, sugar, and onion powder in a small bowl. Pour the mixture evenly over the sandwiches. Take a spoon and spread the mixture over the top of the rolls.

Make sure they’re all generously coated! Cover the dish and refrigerate 1 hour to overnight.

Bake the sandwiches, uncovered, in the 350°F oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and the rolls are golden brown.

Once the sandwiches are out of the oven, you can combine them with a nice salad or side dish for a mouthwatering meal! The possibilities are endless, and this savory recipe is at the top of my favorites list!

To learn more about the Arizona Beef Ambassador and the program visit the Arizona State Cowbelles’ website here.

Meet Your Rancher: Cassie Lyman

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography

Name and Ranch Name: Cassie Lyman, Lyman Ranches

Where are you located: Gisela and Roosevelt Lake, Arizona

Q. Tell us about yourself, your family and about your ranch:

A. I am a first-generation agriculturalist (in other words, I am the first in my family to be a farmer or rancher). I grew up a city kid even though my family had what most would consider a hobby farm. We raised typical backyard farm animals and participated in 4-H and FFA. I showed rabbits, chickens, ducks, geese, pigs, sheep, steers, and horses. I have been riding horses since my mom was pregnant with me, so I like to say before I was born. Growing up, I loved competing with my horses in breed association horse shows, 4-H competitions, and high school rodeos. I always wanted to be a real cowgirl and dreamt of one day marrying a real cowboy.

My dream came true just after high school when I married my husband Jared, a sixth-generation cattle rancher. We have been married for 18 years and have four boys: Elias 14, Haskin 11, Tate 8, and Pratt 5. They all love to ride horses and help at the ranch, and we hope they will carry on our family legacy as 7th generation cattle ranchers. Of course, I started out all my boys on horses the same way my mom did (while they were in my belly), then hanging on behind me, and as soon as my kids can reach the stirrup of a kids saddle, they take the reins and ride their horse all by themselves.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography

A little more about our ranch: We have a cow-calf cattle ranch on the north shore of Roosevelt Lake in Arizona and co-own and operate an additional ranch with my husband’s parents in Gisela, Arizona. Between the two ranches (Hat Ranch and Bar L Bar Ranch), we run just over 300 head of cattle on over 50,000 acres of public land. We raise commercial Angus-cross cattle (Angus breed because that is what the market desires and a touch of Brahman breed because of its adaptability to the Arizona desert environment our cattle forage in). We sell our calves to the commercial market, which means the beef you buy in the grocery store or eat at your favorite fast-food restaurant starts at a ranch like mine. We also direct-sell beef to consumers by the individual cut or by whole, half, and/or quarter beef. With an increase in people wanting to know where their food comes from (how it was raised and making the connection to their food), we too are growing in the number of beef we raise for consumers from start to finish right on our ranch.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography

Q. What is the best part about ranch life? What are the struggles?

A. I really have a hard time picking favorite things and best parts, so I will narrow it down to my top favorites. Family makes the top. Getting to be with and work alongside my family every day is one of the best parts. I wouldn’t be honest if I didn’t say there are “those days.” There is a saying in the cattle community, “Sorry for what I said, we were working cattle.” So yes, there are days when you may need to go to town for “groceries,” aka “a minute away,” but we all have those days in every profession. It truly is a blessing to get to help each other out every day, to depend on one another, knowing the inside and out of the work stress of your spouse. The opportunity to be a team in your home life and work life, as one and the same, is irreplaceable. The whole family, kids, and parents, working together toward the same goal and learning together along the way is priceless.

Another favorite of ranch life is the opportunity it provides to teach my children to have a strong work ethic. Animals are depending on us, come rain or shine, school activities, or sports to provide for them. My kids know that even when we have a late-night or a holiday, chores still need to be done. They are taught to work and work hard until the job is done no matter what, something our society is missing these days.

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography

Another great thing about ranch life is the time spent outdoors. Our whole family loves the outdoors, and yes, ranch life offers a lot of that. A long day riding my horse under the big blue sky, as large fluffy clouds dance across the horizon, with my four boys horseback following me, while we gather cattle from the mountain range, is sometimes surreal. I often pinch myself to remember I’m not dreaming. I consider myself so very lucky. I love the opportunity we have to be outdoors, caring for the land and for God’s creations. To watch a calf be born and trying to take his first steps, their cute noses, and soft coat. These top my “best part of ranch life” list too.

Though struggles, there are many. The top would be government regulations and consumer misinformation. As time goes on, these two struggles are getting harder and harder and are forcing many production agriculture operations out of business.

Q. In addition to ranch and mom life, in what other things are you involved?

A. I wear many hats, and I am not just an ordinary mom, I guess (even though I really think I am). Not only do I do routine household chores, but also bake from scratch, garden, and do canning or home food preservation. From my ranch Facebook page, many know I am completely involved in the day to day operations of the ranch from fixing fence and helping calve to being horseback gathering cattle and even hauling calves.

Other activities I give a lot of time to include:

  • PTO
  • 4-H project leader
  • Volunteer to help youth with projects including livestock, horse, working ranch horse, cooking, sewing, canning, robotics, photography, public speaking, S.T.E.A.M., shooting sports, leadership and more
  • Cattle community organizations such as my county and state cattle growers’ associations. I’ve served as Gila County Farm Bureau President and served on the Arizona Farm Bureau Federation State board.
  • Volunteer with the Arizona Farm Bureau Agriculture in the Classroom
  • Serve on the Northern Gila County Fair board
  • Young Women’s President of the Tonto Basin Branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Q. Why do you commit so many hours to volunteer in your community?

A. I have thought about this question time and time again, and I never feel I have a right answer. I always say, “I don’t know, I just do.” As I have really taken the time to ponder, it is because serving makes me happy! Putting someone else’s needs before my own, helping to make a difference, seeing the joy of others because of the time I was willing to give are the reasons why! As a selfish reason, maybe validation. I absolutely love inspiring youth and advocating for agriculture. The warm fuzzy I get inside when someone says thank you, couldn’t have done this without you, is a fantastic feeling. When someone asks me where I find the time to do what I do, I tell them you make time for the things you love. Investing your time in people is time well spent. And anything worth having takes hard work!

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography

Q. What would you like to share with someone who is not familiar with raising cattle?

A. As cattle ranchers, my family and I truly care for the land and natural resources. John James Audubon once said, “A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his father but borrowed from his children.” We want to pass our ranch(es) and our ranching legacy down to future generations, to see our grandchildren and even great-grandchildren and on, productively and sustainably raising cattle on the same land we raised cattle on. We study the land in cooperation with the University of Arizona and the U.S. Forest Service collecting data and analyzing forage trends. We provide water for wildlife. There are significant misconceptions around western cattle ranching and grazing on public lands. It is essential that if people have questions, they ask a real rancher, visit the ranch and get first-hand information. It seems agriculture is always under attack, but don’t fall for the latest headline getting media attention or the product labeling jargon. Know your farmers or ranchers, and you’ll know your food. Stop fighting against agriculture and start making friends in agriculture because without them, who will feed you and your family?

Q. If you could describe in one word the life of a rancher, what would it be?

A. I don’t do good with picking just one, and as I weigh the good days with the stressful days, the words I come up with seem to cross each other out. Things I considered are the beauty of riding under an indescribable Arizona summer sunset and still cattle ranching like the old-time western movies (wide open spaces, riding horseback to gather cattle, working as a family, and homemade meals together at the table). This is then compared to the fall of the cattle market prices, drought-stricken parched land or losing your best mother cow because she was torn to pieces by a reintroduced protected species called a Mexican Gray Wolf (this is reality for many of our ranching family friends Northeast of us). The hard work, blood sweat and tears and, the joy of summer rains, and a good calf crop. The highs are high, but the lows are low, so my one word would be: ineffable!

Photo by Hazel Lights Photography

Q. Lastly and of course, most importantly, what is your favorite cut of beef, and how do you like to prepare it?

A. I am going to pick Lyman Ranches #ranchraisedbeef Rib Steak. Bring steak to room temperature. Heat BBQ grill to high heat, liberally apply (course ground) salt and pepper each side of steak, sear each side, reduce heat to low and cook till internal temp is at least 130⁰ but no more than 145⁰ (needs to be pink still). Garlic butter sauce or melting blue cheese crumble on top to serve! 

This blog post is made possible by the generous support of the Arizona Cattle Industry Research and Education Foundation.

Beef Stroganoff by Brooke Appetit

Phoenix temps dropped below 80 so naturally I pull out all the creamy, cozy, fall recipes I have. Beef Stroganoff is my go to! It’s a dinner that has been around for ages but this traditional dish is perfect for the change in season. Tender strips of beef with a creamy seasoned mushroom sauce, finished off over fluffy egg noodles.  Hands down I could not think of a better November meal than this cozy dish. I LOVE this recipe. Best part? It’s SO easy. It’s my husband’s favorite dish that I make, so you can usually find it on my fall night weekly rotation! Make this soon and enjoy it…..preferably with extra beef and sauce too. Thanks for stopping by!

-XOXO, Brooke Appetit

Ingredients

½ lb white mushrooms, sliced
1 medium onion, sliced
4 tablespoons butter
2 pounds sirloin steak (sliced in strips ¼  to ½ inch thick)
3 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon garlic salt
½ teaspoon onion salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon paprika
2 garlic cloves, minced
½ cup sherry
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 can beef consommé
¾ cup sour cream

Method

  • Sauté mushrooms, onion and garlic in 2 tablespoons of butter on medium – high heat for 4-5 minutes until onions are translucent, remove from skillet.
  • Melt remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to skillet and brown meat. (Don’t overcrowd your pan) While meat is browning season with salt, pepper, garlic salt, onion salt and paprika.
  • Sprinkle flour, cook for 30 seconds
  • Add tomato paste, cook for 1-2 minutes.
  • Add sherry, let simmer until reduced by half then add beef consommé.
  • Simmer for 1 ¼ hours or until the beef is tender.
  • Add sour cream and combine, add sautéed onions, mushrooms and garlic.
  • Serve hot over egg noodles and garnish with parsley!

A YouTube campaign promoting beef’s great taste and thoughtful animal care generated 1,480,876 video views among Arizona consumers this spring and summer. Meanwhile, the campaign’s Google Search Advertising component generated nearly 8,000 clicks at a click-through rate that was much higher than average.

The checkoff-funded campaign was conducted by the Arizona Beef Council through a grant provided by the Iowa Beef Industry Council. ABC worked with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) team to help plan, execute and monitor the digital campaign, allowing it to utilize the full amount of the grant to reach target consumers, rather than paying advertising agency fees. NCBA, a beef checkoff contractor, provides this service free-of-charge to state beef councils.

Not only did the campaign successfully reach numerous Arizona consumers in the targeted 18-44 age range, but it did so at an exceptionally low cost. The YouTube cost per video view (CPV) was $.02, significantly below the industry average of $.04-.05 per view. The video view rate was 42 percent, which was much higher than the industry average of 30-35 percent.

The Google Search campaign Cost per Click was $.40, with a Clickthrough Rate (CTR) of 7.42 percent. The industry average CTR rate for similar ads is 3-4 percent.

“We were thrilled with both the reach and the cost effectiveness of this campaign,” said Mary Jo Rideout, ABC chair. “Beef messages were regularly touching Arizona consumers during this five-month effort.”

The video campaign on YouTube included bumper ads with a “Hungry for Beef” theme that were 6-seconds long and ran uninterrupted. These videos were viewed about 880,000 times at a cost per view of about 4/10ths of a penny each. These short ads help drive brand awareness and extend reach. Longer 15 and 30 second ads with the “Nicely Done” theme were viewed more than 300,000 times.

Ads with a Rethink the Ranch theme had nearly 300,000 views at an average CPV of $.02. The Google Search campaign generated an average search position of 1.9, meaning that on average Arizona campaign ads were showing up in either the first or second spot in Google search results.

“This campaign demonstrates that using YouTube and Google to reach today’s millennial consumer makes sense,” said Janine Moore, Iowa Beef Industry Council Chairmen. “We appreciated the chance to work with the Arizona Beef Council to deliver beef messages to a huge number of consumers in a high population area.”

For more information visit the Arizona Beef Council website at www.arizonabeef.org.

HIIT for Heart

This post was written by Celia Dubauskas. Celia is an undergraduate student at Arizona State University, studying Nutrition Communication. This spring, she has been an intern for Arizona Beef Council, creating written and social content for our platforms. Celia is an experienced fitness professional and is certified as a personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Her passion for fitness has fueled her interest in nutrition and learning more about health and diet culture.

Did you know the American Heart Association certifies eight cuts of beef as part of a heart-healthy diet? Give Celia’s HIIT for Heart workout a try and then refuel with some delicious and nutritious beef to get that strong, healthy heart you’ve always wanted (and need!).

There is no doubt that exercise is good for both our physical health and mental well-being.  Consistent exercise routines create habit and intention, increasing our cardiovascular health and ensuring proper dopamine levels. We set goals, and when we achieve them, we grow in confidence and strength.  Exercise makes us happy! 

So why don’t we do more?

One of the biggest challenges we face today is time.  Never have Americans been so busy.  We all get 24 hours in a day, but how we choose to spend that time varies person to person.  To many, it seems impossible to reach their fitness goals because there is no time to get to the gym or squeeze in a workout.  Some do not have the financial means to have a gym membership or invest in equipment. 

What if all you needed was to move your body for 20 minutes?  Can you make the time?  Sure you can!

Surely, it cannot be that easy.  But yes, it can! Interval training is the latest and greatest fitness trend.  By rapidly increasing your heart rate with a quick rest in between each exercise, you can burn more calories than a traditional weight and cardio session combined.  HIIT training has been proven to blast fat and improve heart health.

All you need is 20 minutes.

Here is a quick 20 minute HIIT workout you can do in the comfort of your own home or outside in the sun.  These five exercises will be performed for 30 seconds followed by a 30 second rest.  Repeat 4 times and there is your 20-minute fat-blasting workout.

Jumping Squats

Butt Kickers

Jumping Lunges

Push Ups

Mountain Climbers

30 Second Exercise

30 Second Rest

5 Exercises

Repeat 4x

Nourish your body with movement, and respect it for all that it allows you to do!  HIIT for happiness and HIIT for heart!