Brooke Appetit: Beef Shish Kabobs with Lebanese Rice

Arizona Beef is delighted to welcome Brooke Appetit back to share another delicious recipe. This one is easy, colorful, and delicious. Read on!

“As our Arizona weather is starting to get nicer (maybe a little?) I love to spend my evenings outside grilling!  Marinated shish kabobs are easy to prepare, fast cooking, and perfect for entertaining. We are using Sirloin for this recipe. Sirloin is less expensive and is a great option because of it’s lean but beefy flavor. If you allow it a few more hours in the marinade, you will be sure to have tender and flavorful kabobs! I like to pair the kabobs with a Lebanese rice that is also easy and delicious. Enjoy!” – Brooke Gladden

Beef Shish Kabobs

Ingredients:

¾ cup vegetable oil or olive oil
¾ cup soy sauce
½ cup lemon juice
1/3  cup Worcestershire
¼ cup mustard
¼ cup honey
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp fresh chopped herbs (I used oregano, basil, rosemary and parsley)
1 ½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons coarsely cracked black pepper
1 ½ lbs Top Sirloin*, cut into 1 inch cubes
Vegetables – cut into chunks
16 mushroom caps
1 large red onion
1 green bell pepper
1 red bell pepper
1 yellow bell pepper
1 orange bell pepper
1 zucchini
1 yellow squash

*Don’t have Top Sirloin? Try these steak swaps for alternate beef cut options that also work well for kabobs.

Method:

1. Whisk the oil, soy sauce, lemon juice, Worcestershire, mustard, honey, garlic, fresh herbs, salt and pepper together in a bowl. Pour half into a resealable plastic bag. Add the beef, coat with the marinade and seal the bag. Marinate in the refrigerator for 6 hours or overnight.

2. A few hours before you are ready to grill add vegetables into a resealable plastic bag and coat with the marinade.

3. Thread pieces of vegetables and beef onto metal skewers.

4. Preheat grill to high heat. You can reduce the heat to medium-high once you put the kabobs on but starting them with a high heat will allow for a nice char. Grill kabobs, turning every 2-3 minutes until all sides have a nice char. I typically grill mine for 8-10 minutes total. Be careful to not overcook the meat. In my opinion, they are best when medium-rare!

Lebanese rice

Ingredients:
1 cup white rice
½ cup vermicelli
1 tbsp olive oil
1 ½  tbsp butter
1 teaspoon salt
2 ¼ cups water
½ cup toasted pine nuts, toast in 1 tbsp butter

Method

  1. In a non-stick pot, heat olive oil and butter on medium-high heat.
  2. Add the vermicelli and continuously stir to toast it evenly. Vermicelli should turn a nice golden brown but be careful, it burns quickly.
  3. Once vermicelli is brown add the rice and stir for about 30 seconds.
  4. Season with salt.
  5. Add 2 ¼ cups water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pot and cook for 15 minutes.
  6. When the rice is fully cooked, remove from the heat and fluff with a fork.
  7. Serve warm with toasted pine nuts on top

About Brooke

Brooke Gladden is a native Arizonian who grew up in a small ex mining town north of Tucson called San Manuel. She attended the University of Arizona graduating with a B.S. in Agriculture Communications.  She currently lives in Palo Verde, AZ with her husband Clint who is a fourth generation farmer at Gladden Farms/ Saddle Mountain Dairy.

She’s a total foodie at heart and normally plans her days around meals. Brooke’s mom (Jacque Phelps) gave her a passion for cooking. She is a wonderful cook who Brooke has had the privilege to learn from while growing up. She says her favorite thing in the world is cooking with my mom.

Check out her website Brooke Appetit for more recipe inspiration and be sure to follow her on Instagram.

Arizona Beef and Brad Prose of Chiles and Smoke Giveaway

Labor Day is coming up quickly and we want to be ready to tackle the grill confidently and in style! To do that, we’ve partnered with someone who celebrates beef often and creates delicious recipes to bring you a yummy giveaway. Brad Prose is a Phoenix-born family man, professional recipe developer, food writer, and culinary photographer – the force behind Chiles and Smoke. His combined passion for fine dining and BBQ shines through his presentations and cooking style. Brad uses social media, the website, and his brand to share his passion and story to inspire new ideas. Not only is he helping us with this giveaway but he also put together a taco recipe just for your enjoyment!

Lots of beefy prizes including gift cards to Omaha Steaks. Photo by Hazel Light Photography.

Giveaway details first.

What do you get?

Grand Prize receives a United We Steak puzzle, tongs, koozie, apron, lighter, and a $100 Omaha Steak gift card.

2nd Prize receives a United We Steak puzzle, tongs, koozie, apron, lighter, and a $50 Omaha Steak gift card.

3rd Prize receives a United We Steak puzzle, tongs, koozie, apron, lighter, and a $25 Omaha Steak gift card.

You have three chances to win! And the steps to enter are easy.

Here’s what you need to do to be eligible for this giveaway.

1- Like this post (LINK) on Instagram.

2- Comment on the same post (LINK) telling us your favorite cut of beef to grill.

3- Like @ArizonaBeef and @ChilesandSmoke on Instagram.

4- Finally, head over to this LINK to fill out a quick entry form.

The contest starts on August 28, 2020 and runs until midnight, Eastern Standard Time, on September 3, 2020.

And now for the recipe!

Ancho Coffee Skirt Steak Tacos

Welcome to Ancho Coffee Skirt Steak Tacos, your gateway to a simple recipe with a huge blast of flavor without much hassle. Amazing salsa, too! You can cook both back to back to save time.

Ingredients
  • Omaha Steaks Skirt Steak, approx 14oz (learn more about Skirt Steak here)
  • 2 Tbsp finely ground coffee
  • 2 Tbsp ancho chile powder
  • 1 Tbsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • Zest of 1 lime
CREAMY CORN SALSA
  • 2 ears corn
  • 1 Cup Mexican crema (or sour cream, mayo)
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded, diced finely
  • 1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 1/2 medium white onion
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 Tbsp Ancho Coffee Rub to season
  • 12 Corn Tortillas

Instructions
  1. Heat up the grill to medium-high heat, around 400-450F.
  2. Mix the rub ingredients together, taste and adjust. Slice the Skirt Steak in half, so you have 2 shorter pieces. This allows you to easily fit both on the grill. Season the Skirt Steaks well and allow the meat to rest while you start the corn.
  3. Grill the corn, turning to char each side if desired. This will take between 6-8 minutes. While the corn is grilling, prepare the other vegetables for the salsa.
  4. Take the corn off the grill and allow them to cool. Place the Skirt Steaks on the grill, do not disturb for 2-3 minutes until it has a nice char. Flip, repeat, and check the temperature for your desired cook. I prefer to grill until 130 for Medium Rare, knowing it will continue to rise as it rests.
  5. The steak is resting, go ahead and cut off the corn kernels.  Mix the corn and the other ingredients together, using the Ancho Coffee Rub to season it. You might need more seasoning depending on your taste.
  6. (Optional) Toss the tortillas on the grill for 1 minute each side for an extra char.
  7. Serve in tortillas, with the salsa.
Notes

Use a coffee that tastes good to you! I prefer dark roast for grilling, but any kind will work. There’s 1 lime in the recipe, make sure you zest it for the rub, then juice it for the salsa.


Enjoy the recipe, enter the contest and get ready for to unite with close family and friends around the grill!

College Student Approved Recipe: Easy Roast Beef Potluck Rolls

This blog post was written by our 2019 Senior Arizona Beef Ambassador Savannah Burt. Arizona Beef Ambassadors are passionate youth advocates for the Arizona beef industry. The winners are the official youth representatives of the Arizona State Cowbelles (ASC) and the beef community. The senior winner travels the state sharing the story of beef from pasture to plate with consumers and students. Savannah is a current college student and explains below how an easy-to-cook-and-prepare recipe is a must for her.


As a busy college student who also lives in a dorm, most of my meals must meet certain criteria. First, it has to be easy to make. Second, it must be inexpensive. Finally, it must be portable. Luckily, this recipe meets every single requirement, and it centers around my favorite source of protein: beef! These roast beef potluck rolls were originally featured on BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com, and they’re as nutritious as they are delicious! The recipe makes 12 servings, each with 21 grams of protein, so it’s perfect for storing in the fridge and eating over a few days or bringing to gatherings with friends or family! Without any further ado, here’s the recipe for roast beef potluck rolls, complete with some tips and tricks from the last time I made it.

Ingredients:
1 pound thinly sliced reduced-sodium deli roast beef
1 package Hawaiian rolls (12 count)
1/4 cup cream-style prepared horseradish
6 slices reduced-fat provolone cheese
1/3 cup butter, melted
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon dried parsley leaves
2 teaspoons packed light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon onion powder

Cooking:

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Coat 9 x 13-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Cut rolls in half, horizontally.

Place the bottom half of the rolls in the baking dish. Spread horseradish on the cut side, and top with roast beef and cheese. Close the sandwiches with the other half of the rolls.

Use a paring knife to cut the rolls into 12 sandwiches. Use your hands to spread the sandwiches apart.

Mix together butter, Worcestershire sauce, parsley, sugar, and onion powder in a small bowl. Pour the mixture evenly over the sandwiches. Take a spoon and spread the mixture over the top of the rolls.

Make sure they’re all generously coated! Cover the dish and refrigerate 1 hour to overnight.

Bake the sandwiches, uncovered, in the 350°F oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and the rolls are golden brown.

Once the sandwiches are out of the oven, you can combine them with a nice salad or side dish for a mouthwatering meal! The possibilities are endless, and this savory recipe is at the top of my favorites list!

To learn more about the Arizona Beef Ambassador and the program visit the Arizona State Cowbelles’ website here.

Beef Stroganoff by Brooke Appetit

Phoenix temps dropped below 80 so naturally I pull out all the creamy, cozy, fall recipes I have. Beef Stroganoff is my go to! It’s a dinner that has been around for ages but this traditional dish is perfect for the change in season. Tender strips of beef with a creamy seasoned mushroom sauce, finished off over fluffy egg noodles.  Hands down I could not think of a better November meal than this cozy dish. I LOVE this recipe. Best part? It’s SO easy. It’s my husband’s favorite dish that I make, so you can usually find it on my fall night weekly rotation! Make this soon and enjoy it…..preferably with extra beef and sauce too. Thanks for stopping by!

-XOXO, Brooke Appetit

Ingredients

½ lb white mushrooms, sliced
1 medium onion, sliced
4 tablespoons butter
2 pounds sirloin steak (sliced in strips ¼  to ½ inch thick)
3 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon garlic salt
½ teaspoon onion salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon paprika
2 garlic cloves, minced
½ cup sherry
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 can beef consommé
¾ cup sour cream

Method

  • Sauté mushrooms, onion and garlic in 2 tablespoons of butter on medium – high heat for 4-5 minutes until onions are translucent, remove from skillet.
  • Melt remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to skillet and brown meat. (Don’t overcrowd your pan) While meat is browning season with salt, pepper, garlic salt, onion salt and paprika.
  • Sprinkle flour, cook for 30 seconds
  • Add tomato paste, cook for 1-2 minutes.
  • Add sherry, let simmer until reduced by half then add beef consommé.
  • Simmer for 1 ¼ hours or until the beef is tender.
  • Add sour cream and combine, add sautéed onions, mushrooms and garlic.
  • Serve hot over egg noodles and garnish with parsley!

St. Patrick’s Day: Celebrate with Beef

Green beer and corned beef day is just around the corner! While you don’t need a recipe for the beer, we can help with the directions on the corned beef. Plus ideas for breakfast and lunch the next day! Bonus: A perfect beef-y brunch drink is included in our recipe round up!

Slow-Cooked Corned Beef in Beer with Red Currant-Mustard Sauce

Let your slow cooker do all the work for this complete meal of beer-braised Corned Beef with fresh cabbage and red potatoes. It’s a great dish for your next celebration.

Dijon-Glazed Corned Beef with Savory Cabbage and Red Potatoes

While Corned Beef braises in the oven, cabbage wedges and potatoes are roasted for a full meal. A bonus recipe for the leftovers is included too!

Corned Beef Brisket with Roasted Vegetables and Lemon-Mustard Sauce

Cook once, dine twice. Enjoy Corned Beef Brisket with roasted carrots, parsnips, cabbage and a lemony sauce tonight, then spin the leftovers into a savory salad tomorrow.

Bloody Bull

Try this brunch favorite with a depth of flavor only beef can provide. Roasted Beef Stock is the secret ingredient to this one of a kind Bloody Mary. Garnish with a beef slider, beef meatball, or whatever you can dream up.

Corned Beef Hash

Tied with the Reuben for the ultimate expression of Corned Beef. Here it’s diced, skillet-cooked with cubed potatoes and thinly sliced leeks, and ideally topped with an egg.

Classic Beef Reuben Sandwich

Try this deli classic for lunch or dinner today. Thinly sliced deli Corned Beef or Pastrami is sandwiched between rye bread with sauerkraut and a tangy home-made dressing.

All photos courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Cattle Byproducts: More Than Just Beef

What do footballs, lipstick, charcoal, paint, and wallpaper have in common? They are all important items we use in our lives and they all come from cattle.

These guys, they are more than just beef! Photo by Dan Bell.

Wait, what? Yup, you heard us! Those items all contain an ingredient from cattle which we call a by-product. The main reason we raise cattle is for the delicious beef they produce. What is left over is called a byproduct. While the word byproduct might sound like something that isn’t useful, don’t let the word deceive you. These items are extremely important to many of the everyday items you use at home.

You can think of it as a recipe. Just like you have a recipe to make, let’s say, meatloaf, there is a recipe to make lipstick, or footballs, or paint. The recipe provides you the ingredient list and the steps to get you to the end product. The byproducts from beef are one of those ingredients on the list.

Just like this Summertime Meat Loaf has a recipe so do other products!
Photo and recipe courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

When we harvest a beef animal, about 60% of that animal becomes beef. The remaining 40% includes things like skin, fat, bones, tendons, organs, etc. Here is where byproducts become especially important. We can’t waste half an animal! But we can use those items in inventive and innovative ways to help make our lives easier.

An obvious byproduct is leather. It comes from the cow’s hide. Cowhides are an important part of most of America’s popular sports. One cowhide can make 12 basketballs OR 144 baseballs OR 20 footballs OR 18 volleyballs OR 18 soccer balls OR 12 baseball gloves.

Gelatin is another great example of a beef byproduct. It comes from connective tissue and is a staple ingredient in anything that jiggles or has that well known springy consistency. Hello Jello and gummy bears! Marshmallows and gum are two other products which contain gelatin.

Photo from BBC News.

It’s not just yummy products which contain cattle byproducts. Many important medical items also contain these useful items. Ointments for burns and first aid creams use byproducts as an ingredient along with extremely important antirejection drugs, which are used when someone has a heart, liver, or other organ transplants. The sticky part on bandages can be made from the fatty acid.

Photo by Cattle Empire‘s blog on cattle byproducts.

Other items which contain beef byproducts are insulin, dog food, rawhide bones, laundry pre-treatment, bone china, toilet paper (to make it soft), glue, dish soap, candles, film, crayons, paintbrushes, printing ink, nail polish remover, deodorants, antifreeze, hydraulic brake fluid, car wax, highways, tires, and so much more!

Add this to the list of reasons why cattle are amazing animals. They take sunlight which was used by plants we cannot eat and turn it into delicious and nutritious beef and all of these things we use to help make life easier. Thank goodness for cows!

Graphic by Cattle Tales.

12 Days of Beef-y Recipes

The big day isn’t far away (we won’t remind you of just how few days you have left to shop) and we thought you might be searching for ideas on what to serve your holiday guests. We’ve compiled a list of 12 beef-y recipes, ranging from appetizers to the main course and everything in between! You may not have your Christmas shopping done, but at least you’ll know what’s on the menu!

Mini Meatball Appetizers with Apricot Dipping Sauce

They’re bite size. They’re delicious. Tooth pick worthy and hungry guest approved.

Tiny Taco Beef Tarts

Okay. Let’s be real here. Who doesn’t love a good taco? Make it tiny, self-contained, and bite-sized and people are going to flip! Shake it up with different toppings such as guacamole, sour cream, and salsa. ¡Feliz Navidad!

Teriyaki Steak Skewers

Because anything you can serve on a stick is a great idea for appetizers. Well, maybe not anything. But these Teriyaki Steak Skewers – they are definitely a good idea.

Beef and Couscous Stuffed Baby Bell Peppers

Some are trying to stay on track with healthy eating during the holiday season. Not us. But other people. For those folks (and really everyone else), try out these bad boys. They are bite size and low cal disguised as delicious!

Cranberry Balsamic Roast Beef

This holiday season, impress your guests with this delicious Cranberry Balsamic Roast Beef! A little tangy, a little sweet and a whole lot of mouthwatering. Perfect to feed a crowd!

Braised Beef Short Ribs with Pecan Pomegranate Tabbouleh

For Chef Justin Turner’s vision of a Texan beef centerpiece combines a signature low-and-slow braise with a Southern riff on tabbouleh—a bejeweled side dish studded with pomegranates and local pecans and designed around easy entertaining. Yum.

All About Prime Rib

This is what you’ve been waiting for. The center of the plate. The crown jewel of any self respecting Christmas smorgasbord. The prime rib. This one isn’t really a recipe, per say, but it’s a resource to help you ensure your prime rib is perfect and has people day dreaming about it well into the new year.

Tamale Pie

Here in the Southwest, tamales are a holiday tradition. Some are talented at the construction and execution of making tamales, while the majority of us are at the will and mercy of those talented tamale makers to provide these delicious corn husk wrapped delicacies. When you are in a pinch, and just need that tamale fix, give this one a whirl!

Caprese Steak Salad

Thinking ahead (i.e. the day after Christmas) you might crave something a little lighter. This salad is fresh, perfect for the leftover roast, and gives you an opportunity to add some greens back into your world.

Sunny’s Sunset Park Noodle Bowl

The holidays are a great time to spend with family and friends. And their germs. Sunny Anderson cooks up this recipe when she starts to feel under the weather because it’s warm, helps to relieve congestion, and is easy to make.

Ribeye Hash

What do you do with all the leftovers?! Make a hash! Costco has a lot of great beef ideas, but this is one of our favorites. No one likes a food waster.

Peanut Butter, Chocolate-Hazelnut and Chocolate Chip Beef Jerky Cookies 

Wait! Before you click out of this blog post because you are looking at the title of this recipe saying, “They’ve finally lost it over there at the beef office,” give this one a chance. These cookies are an excellent way to sneak some extra protein into your diet through an unlikely source.

From all of us to all of you, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Professional to Professional: Culinary Instructors Meet Beef Cattle Farmers and Ranchers

In June, sixteen culinary experts from across the country got a taste of the beef industry during the Pasture to Plate Beef Tour, sponsored by beef councils in California, Colorado, Arizona, Oklahoma and Texas. Invited to the checkoff-funded event were the culinary chairs responsible for the 28 International Culinary Schools at the Art Institutes across the country. The non-profit Art Institutes operate the largest system of culinary schools in the United States.

The tour featured a visit to a cow-calf ranch, feedlot and the JBS beef processing facility in northern Colorado, along with presentations from beef experts that helped the culinary leaders understand beef’s role in a sustainable food system, and ideas for incorporating sensory and beef umami exercises into their classrooms. Attendees also had an opportunity to participate in a beef cooking competition that demonstrated their culinary talents.chefs on wagonThe spark for development of this tour was generated last fall during the California Beef Council’s Beef Leadership Summit, according to the CBC’s Christie Van Egmond, director of retail and foodservice marketing, who helped organize the tour. At that time Dave Hendricksen, the national culinary director for the Art Institutes, expressed interest in giving the Institutes’ culinary leaders more backgrounding in the beef industry.

“This is a great way to connect the next generation of chefs with those who produce the food,” Hendricksen said. He said it was “critical” that information this type of event provides gets carried down from the participating culinary leaders to the students in culinary schools studying to be chefs or operation managers.chefs in kitchenStanding out to those attending the tour was the well-being of animals throughout the process, Hendricksen said. “The constant theme of this event was animal welfare and the care for the environment,” he said. “It was amazing.”

Arizona is home to the Arts Institute of Phoenix that includes a large culinary program. The Arizona Beef Council sponsored Chef Noel Ridsdale, culinary program chair, to attend the national tour. Here is Chef Noel’s feedback about his experience.

Chef Noel:

I want to express my deepest gratitude to the Arizona Beef Council for sponsorship of my attendance at the beef checkoff-funded Pasture to Plate Beef Tour for the Art Institutes (AI). This experience was very educational and collaborative in the ways that we were able to connect with the beef council professionals, as well as with each of the AI national directors individually.Noel in kitchenThe tour started on a high note with a tour of a Colorado ranch, with some great knowledge shared by the breeders on how the cattle are treated, the process for the birthing and production management. The aspects of feed analysis and herd health were very interesting. We had dinner on the ranch, and the chef turned out to be an alum of AI, and his selection of items and ways to use beef was very good.

The trip to the packing plant was very interesting. I have been in Certified Angus Beef processing facilities before but never in a mainline producer. This was one of the highlights of the tour for me. I was very interested in the sanitation, inspection process and the zero waste production aspects of the tour. I cut meat myself, but my skills do not match the speed and accuracy of the cutters on the floor there. Watching the entire process enlightened me to the accuracy and technical aspects of production but at the same time still marveled at the human element that is still involved in the process.chefs in Culinary CenterThe science of the feedlot was interesting, and it was great to see that the industry is using green technology by utilizing byproducts of other industries, such as the beer industry. This use of their byproducts as opposed to just corn would add more flavor to the beef.

The presentations on the science of beef and the practical cooking aspects were very good, and our recipes will be featured on www.BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com soon. Overall, experiencing these aspects of beef production gave me additional knowledge that I am able to utilize in my classrooms.

Thank you very much for the opportunity!

Noel G. Ridsdale, MBA, CEC, CCA, AAC

Program Chair – AI Phoenix


Editor’s Note: The Art Institute of Phoenix is closing December 28, 2018 due to unfortunate circumstances. The Arizona Beef Council is glad to have met Chef Noel and we look forward to working with him in his next ventures.

Fancy Night In: Filet Mignon with Mushroom Wine Sauce

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Brooke from Brooke Appetit recently took over our Instagram. She shared a recipe with us and also a little more about the dairy that she and her husband live and work on in Buckeye, Arizona. Her husband, Clint, is a fourth generation farmer at Saddle Mountain Dairy. Clint and his dairy focus on keeping their dairy cows comfortable even during the hottest of months.  Special misters are installed in their cow barns which keep it down to a cool 85 degrees Fahrenheit even when it’s 110 degrees outside.

IMG_1592

Not only is temperature a focus but proper nutrition also sorts itself to the top of the priority list. A mixture of hay, grains, vitamins, and minerals is fed to their cows to ensure they are healthy while producing healthy milk for us to use. To get the full recap of the day, head over to the Arizona Beef Instagram page and check out our highlights. In the meantime, we wanted to make sure you could make Brooke’s delicious creation at home so here is the recipe!

Fancy Night In: Filet Mignon with a Mushroom Wine Sauce

Ingredients
6 Tbsp butter, divided
4 Tbsp olive oil, divided
16 oz baby bella mushrooms, thickly sliced
1 small or 1/2 medium red onion, finely diced
4 medium garlic cloves, minced
2 Tbsp chopped fresh thyme ( reserve a few sprigs for garnish)
4  Beef Filet Mignon steaks (about 2” thick)
1/2 cup a good Cabernet or Merlot you would drink
1 1/2 cups low sodium beef broth
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
Salt and Pepper to taste

6W5A1386

Method
1. Place a large cast iron pan over medium/high heat and melt 3 Tbsp butter and 2 Tbsp oil. Add mushrooms and cook 3-5 minutes until soft. Stir in onion and cook another 3 minutes. Press in garlic cloves then season with salt, pepper, and freshly chopped thyme. Cook another 2 min, stirring constantly until garlic is fragrant, then transfer mushroom mixture to a plate. Wipe the skillet clean with a wet paper towel.


2. Pat dry steaks with a paper towel and season all over with sea salt and cracked
pepper.

6W5A1421
3. Place the same pan over medium/high heat and add 3 Tbsp butter and 2 Tbsp
oil. When butter is hot and finished foaming, add seasoned steaks to skillet,
turning over once with tongs, about 3-5 min per side for medium-rare. To best determine doneness, use an instant-read thermometer and utilize these helpful tips. If steak is browning too fast, reduce heat to medium. Use tongs to transfer steaks to the
plate with mushrooms. Also, keep in mind thinner steaks will cook faster and thicker steaks can take longer.

4. Add 1/2 cup wine and boil until reduced by half (3 minutes), scraping the bottom
with a wooden spoon to deglaze the pan. Add 1 1/2 cups broth and boil until about 2/3 cup liquid remains (5-6 minutes). Add 1/2 cup of cream and boil until sauce thickens slightly (2 minutes). Return mushrooms and steak to the pan and heat until warmed through (1-2 minutes)

Season sauce to taste with more salt & pepper, if desired. Serve immediately. Plate the steak and sauce over some creamy mashed potatoes and a side of steamed asparagus.

6W5A1476Enjoy, friends!

Brooke will be back with us again soon! Stay tuned!

In the Kitchen with Kids

Does the thought of kids helping in the kitchen send you into a fit of anxiety with visions of big messes and broken dishes? Fear not! Though we can’t guarantee the prevention of a mess or two, there are many benefits to having the little ones help to prepare meals. Here are some tips from Katy Wright, Arizona cattlewoman, mom, and survivor of letting her three kids (all under 5) help in the kitchen. And she does it all with grace.


1-9-2018_ABCBlog.KidsinKitchen_Wrights
The Wright family: Katy and Kelly, HB, Katherine and Richard.

Memories from my childhood include hot meals on the table and beef on the menu more than anything else. I grew up completely confident that beef was a “no brainer” for feeding families, especially children. I still hold this same opinion today with my own kids and am grateful I can frequently include beef as our protein of choice. I’ve learned some tips for including beef on kid-friendly menus as well as some ideas on ways to include kids in the kitchen.

Tip #1: Cook once, eat twice.

Or three times. Time is valuable, isn’t it? Even if you don’t have multiple small children underfoot, time always seems to be in short supply. One of the best tips I can offer while meal planning, is to plan on cooking your cut of choice and then how you would like to use the leftovers. This saves both time and money in the long run. One of my favorite ways to do this include roasts in the slow cooker (like a Crock-Pot). The slow cooker always makes me look good because I can “set it and forget it” and go about the business of my day with minimal thought about dinner. Just last week I put a top round roast in the slow cooker with a can of beer and packet of onion soup mix. It cooked all day, and I served it with potatoes and a vegetable that night. I made the most of my leftovers by making roast beef sandwiches the next day, and burritos the day after that. Win-win-win.

HB helping cook ground beef. For enchiladas, I lay out the ingredients and HB helps assemble.

Tip #2: Provide safe opportunities for kids to participate.

My kids are at the wonderful (and sometimes chaotic) stage of life where they want to help with everything. Whether it’s washing windows, changing laundry or cutting vegetables, they are often asking if they can chip in. And while it is easier and more efficient at times to charge forward without them, this is the time of their lives to be creating helpful habits for the future. They also take pride in the tasks in which they get to contribute. When it comes to kids helping in the kitchen, slow down, and find tasks that can be completed safely by small hands. In my own kitchen, some of these tasks include stirring ground beef as it cooks, peeling carrots and adding spices.

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Katherine helping make biscuits. Stirring anything is a task all three of my kids are qualified for.

Tip #3: Choice is the spice of life.

My kids love getting to choose. It doesn’t matter what the options are, they love having the power to choose. If you struggle with getting kids to eat their dinner, whether it’s just the vegetables or all of it, make choices a consistent part of your dinner time routine. When I’m meal planning, I ask for suggestions from my kids on what we should include on that week’s menu. More often than not they request hamburgers but it still makes them feel included. Another way to incorporate decision making, is to allow your kids to choose what they eat and when. I don’t mean letting them choose cereal over a hot meal for a dinner that you’ve prepared, instead allow them to choose if they’re going to eat their beef or vegetables first. This empowers them and allows them to feel like they have a little control over their own decisions.

1-9-2018_ABCBlog.KidsinKitchen_Richard
Richard does not look particularly helpful in this photo, but he loves “helping” no matter what’s involved. He’s often stationed on the counter next to me while I cook.

Like all things in life, children change and grow constantly, forcing us parents to adapt and grow with them. Intentional choices like meal planning leftovers, slowing down to allow children to help and providing opportunities for choice can make a huge difference in their lives.