Beef Enchiladas with Kailee Zimmerman

As a fifth generation Arizonan, I love life in the desert and am captivated with the culture of the Southwest. The cactus dotted landscape, beautiful sunsets and mountains create a landscape that is like none other. It feels that the last bit of the “Old West” is preserved here.


Not only do I love the landscape and tradition of the Southwest, but I also love the food! Much of the food is shaped by hispanic culture and my family grew up eating a lot of that food. One of my favorite meals is beef enchiladas. They are a staple at my house, but they also remind me of
one of my favorite traditions. We have enchiladas and celebrate “Feliz Navidad” every Christmas Eve with all of my extended family.


Our favorite enchilada recipe is from The Pioneer Woman. I’ll share some tips that we learned from making these enchiladas, but make sure to check out the full recipe at the bottom of this post!


One of the most important parts of the enchiladas is the red sauce.

The base of the sauce is a canned red enchilada sauce, and flour, canola oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder, chicken broth, and cilantro is also added to it. All of these ingredients are mixed together and heated till they come to a boil. When the ingredients are boiling, turn down the heat and let the sauce simmer for 30-45 minutes.


Now it’s time for the star of the show! The yummy, beef filling!

Cook the Ground Beef in a skillet until it is about halfway done. When it is halfway done, add in a chopped onion, green chiles, cilantro, salt and pepper. Mix this all together and cook until the Ground Beef is browned all of the way through. Ground Beef should be cooked to a safe and savory 160ºF.


Next, it’s time to cook the tortillas. These enchiladas are wrapped in corn tortillas, but I love flour tortillas and usually use those. Choose whichever you prefer!


Time to assemble the enchiladas! Put some spoonfuls of red sauce in the bottom of a casserole dish and spread evenly on the bottom. Using tongs, dip both sides of the tortilla into the red sauce. Put the beef filling and grated cheese in the tortilla, wrap and place in your casserole dish.


Repeat until your dish is full.


Top with extra red sauce, plenty of cheese and some cilantro.


Cook at 350 degrees for about 25 minutes, until the cheese is melted.


While I love this recipe, it’s the tradition and memories behind it that mean even more to me. Food has a way of bringing people together and it is even better when beef is the star of the show!


Check out the full recipe and read a fun story by The Pioneer Woman, Ree Drummond, here: Simple Perfect Enchiladas.

Beef: The Ultimate Meat Substitute

Beef is the king of protein because it’s chock-full of zinc, iron, protein, and B vitamins plus 6 other essential nutrients, making it the ultimate “meat substitute.” Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. put their creative juices to work along with celebrity chefs and came up with some recipes to make beef the substitute of popular “other” dishes. Think Beef in a Blanket, Beef Parmesan, and Cowlamari. Explore these recipes and more below and then try them at home!

Beef in a Blanket with Chef Brooke Williamson

Chef Brooke Williamson offers a beefy twist on the tailgating classic, Pigs in a Blanket, with Beef in a Blanket featuring Braised Beef Short Ribs and a Gochujang Honey Mustard Dipping Sauce.

Link to video HERE.

Beef Parmesan WITH CHEF CARRIE BAIRD

Chef Carrie Baird beefs up a tried-and-true crowd pleaser turning Chicken Parmesan into Beef Parmesan.

Link to video HERE.

Cowlarmari with Chef Lamar Moore

Lamar Moore is one of Chicago’s favorite chefs, but he knows that squid isn’t always so popular. Watch him replace surf with turf and turn Calamari into Cowlamari.

Link to video HERE.

Maple-Mustard Glazed Ribeye Roast with CHEF HUGH ACHESON

Chef Hugh Acheson uses maple syrup to put a Canadian twist on Glazed Ham for a juicy maple-mustard glazed Ribeye Roast.

Link to video HERE.

All photos and videos courtesy of Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.

Summer Beef Recipe Round Up

Summertime is the perfect opportunity to try something new and delicious in the kitchen or on the grill. Here is a round up of some of our favorites from www.BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com.

Hawaiian Ribeye Steaks with Grilled Pineapple Salad

Pretend you’re in a tropical location and put this on the grill. Ribeye Steaks are spiced up with cilantro, cumin and ground red pepper and served with a simple salad of pineapple, red pepper and lime. Link here.

Grilled Top Round Steak with Parmesan Asparagus

Try out a cut often overlooked with this recipe. After soaking in a tasty vinegar-garlic marinade, this Top Round Steak is grilled alongside fresh asparagus. Link here.

Salad Shakers

Trying to keep it on the healthier side this summer? Shake up your lunch and dinner routine. Mix your favorite salad ingredients with Ground Beef on top. Link here.

Mediterranean Beef and Salad Pita

Traditional ingredients like feta, olives and pita bread give this salad a Mediterranean twist. The addition of Ground Beef gives it a boost of power-packed protein. Link here.

Barbecue Chipotle Burgers

Burgers are always a safe bet for a family cookout, but try this recipe to shake up the same ole’ same ole’. Whip up your own beer-based barbecue sauce, then slather it on a perfectly prepared Ground Beef patty. Serve it all up in a “bun” of delicious Texas Toast. Link here.

St. Louis Burgers

There’s a new burger in town! Try our St. Louis burger, featuring Ground Beef, cheese ravioli, marinara sauce and ricotta cheese. Link here.

Classic Smoked Beef Brisket

Do you have a smoker sitting at home but not quite sure what to do with it? Check this out. Sliced or shredded, this smoked Brisket is great on its own or in a variety of applications. Link here.

Smoked Tri-Tip Street Tacos

Now you know how to use the smoker, here’s an idea for the end product. Smoked and roasted Tri-Tip is unexpected in a street taco. Try this flavorful version with your favorite toppings for a satisfying meal. Link here.

For even more recipe ideas, check out www.BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com.

Beef and Chorizo Burger, Flavors of Arizona by Chiles and Smoke

What’s more Arizona than a cheeseburger topped with beef chorizo and grilled nopales? We can’t think of much. Brad, Phoenix-based master BBQ chef of Chiles and Smoke, is bringing us another delicious recipe and this time it’s to highlight National Beef Burger Day. Check out his blog here and be sure to bookmark or save this page for future use. Brad’s helpful step-by-step tutorial video is at the end of the recipe.

Brad Prose, of Chiles and Smoke, created a delicious recipe National Beef Burger Day.
Beef and Chorizo Burger
  • Author: Brad Prose
  •  Prep Time: 10
  •  Cook Time: 10
  •  Total Time: 20
  •  Yield: 2–3 1x
  •  Category: Beef
  •  Method: Griddle
  •  Cuisine: Burger

Description

Arizona inspires this beef and chorizo burger, topped with charred nopales, creamy muenster cheese, and refreshing cilantro crema.

Ingredients
Cilantro-Lime Crema
  • 1/2 cup Mexican crema
  • 1/8 cup cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • 2 tsp fresh lime juice
  • salt to taste
Beef and Chorizo Burger
  • 2 cactus paddles (nopales) trimmed and washed
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 fresh chorizo
  • 2 beef burgers, 3-4oz each (80/20 preferred)
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp Mexican oregano
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 slices muenster cheese
  • 2 buns, brioche
Instructions
  1. Mix the ingredients together for the crema. Season and adjust. Keep in the fridge until needed.
  2. Preheat the heating surface to medium-high heat. If using a flat top or griddle, set up a 2-zone area with the second side at low.
  3. Lightly salt and sear the nopales for 3-4 minutes per side until lightly charred. Flip as needed. When cooked, remove from heat and slice into thin strips.
  4. Cook the chorizo. Stir frequently, making sure it crisps but doesn’t burn. Right before it’s finished, stir in the nopales to mix together. Remove from heat. If using a flat top or griddle, move to the cooler side.
  5. Toast the buns. We have that delicious chorizo fat for a reason.
  6. Mix the salt, pepper, oregano, and garlic powder together. Season one side of the beef burger and sear it on the griddle, face down. Season the top of the burger. Allow it to crisp up on the bottom, about 3-4 minutes. Flip when you have a nice crust and continue to cook until patty reaches 160°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
  7. Divide the chorizo and cactus into small piles to go onto the burger. Place a slice of the muenster cheese on each pile. The cheese will melt, holding everything together. Slide this pile on top of the burger and continue to cook until the preferred temperature.
  8. Build your buns with the crema, and then the burger and toppings.

Notes

Brad recommends using a lighter bun, such as brioche or white bread. The burger and toppings are heavier and rich so you want to make sure the bun isn’t as well.

Grilling season is here!

Living in Arizona gives us certain advantages over other states and one of the most important ones is the fact that grilling season lasts all year long! But that doesn’t mean there isn’t something extra special about gathering in the back yard on a warm summer evening as burgers, steaks, and hot dogs sizzle on the grill, the sounds of chatting and play drape across the grass, and a cold drink perspires in your hand. So even though we are blessed with the ability to fire up the grill year-round, let’s celebrate the official start of grilling season with some of our favorite beef burger recipes and cooking tips.

Burger Recipes

Check out the list below of our favorite beef burger recipes. Click on the title of each for the full recipe.

Image and recipe courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Classic Beef Cheeseburgers

Master this classic burger recipe and you’ll be the king (or queen) of the grill from here on out!

Image and recipe courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Caribbean Beef Burgers with Mango Salsa

Spicy, sweet and oh-so-simple. Ground Beef gets a peppery boost from jerk seasoning, and the freshly chopped mango salsa gives the dish a cool finish.

Image and recipe courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Deli Burgers

Six ingredients are all you need to prepare these delicious, delectable deli burgers.

Image and recipe courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Cheesehead Sliders

Because everyone loves a slider and it is made all the better with lots of cheese.

Cooking Tips

Image courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Grilling Basics

Because grilling season just isn’t grilling season without a grill, here is a link to all the grilling tips you could want and need. This will provide you with step-by-step instructions on how to ensure success with all of your guests’ taste buds.

Image courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Food Safety

We know you know how to keep things on the up and up, but it doesn’t hurt to review your beef food safety knowledge just to be sure.

For more recipes like these and information visit www.BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com and www.ArizonaBeef.org.

Beef Cooking Lesson: Grilling Basics

With the Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. 300 at Daytona this weekend at the Daytona International Speedway (the day before the big NASCAR DAYTONA 500 race) and grilling season right around the corner, we thought it was a great time to share another beef cooking lesson. This time on grilling basics. This is a popular method for preparing steak, but it’s also the one that tends to worry a lot of beginner cooks. When you follow these steps (and allow yourself a little practice), you’ll find grilling is easy and—most importantly—very satisfying. Check out our grilling guidelines for more cooking time information.

PREP PAYS OFF

Some grill experts emphasize the importance of bringing steaks to room temperature before grilling, but we don’t recommend it for food safety reasons. Likewise, our cooking chart is based on the meat going directly from chill to grill. So plan on pulling the meat from the fridge, seasoning well, and getting started right away.

FIRE IT UP

Make sure your grill grate is clean. If you’re using charcoal, follow the directions for how much you’ll need and how to build the charcoal pile. For gas grills, refer to your owner’s manual and set the grill to medium.

GRILL, BABY, GRILL

Use an instant-read thermometer to monitor doneness, let it go—don’t flip the steaks so much! One flip is usually all you need, but take care to avoid charring or burning and be ready to turn down the heat (or move to a cooler spot on the grill) if necessary. Keep in mind the internal temperature will continue to rise for a few minutes after coming off the grill.

REST RELAX

Here’s another step novice cooks often overlook: resting the meat before serving—even if you’re hungry. It’s seriously worth the wait, because it prevents all those tasty juices from draining onto your plate. For most grill-friendly cuts, about five minutes is enough.

FINISHING TOUCHES

If you’re slicing the steak before serving, be sure to cut across the grain to maximize tenderness. There’s no shortage of tips for assembling a great burger. For steaks, we recommend topping them off with compound butter or serving with a sauce.

THREE STEPS TO THE PERFECT GRILLED BURGER 
  1. Set grill to medium and let heat for a minimum of 10 minutes if using gas or until coals turn white if using charcoal. Form patties and season liberally with salt and pepper. Place a dimple in the center of the burger patty to minimize shrinking and optimize cooking. 
  2. Place burgers on the grill and cook approximately 4 to 5 minutes, depending on size and thickness. Flip burger and grill an additional 4 to 5 minutes or until the center of the burger reaches an internal temperature of 160°F. 
  3. Avoid pressing down on burgers and only flip burgers once during cooking.  

For more cooking lessons just like this, check out www.BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com .

Celebrating Heart Month with Arizona Beef

February is Heart Month, both in terms of love and the actual thing beating in your chest. We celebrate all that is love on the 14th of this month with romantic dinners for two and give extra attention to keeping your ticker ticking all month long. We want you to have the best Heart Month ever, so we’ve compiled a list of nutritional resources on how to include beef in a heart-healthy diet along with ways to get your significant other’s heart racing with love, beef included, of course.

Beef as Part of a Heart-Healthy Lifestyle

Eating for a healthy heart and enjoying one of your favorite foods—these two things don’t have to be at odds with one another! Recent research shows that eating lean beef as part of a heart healthy dietary pattern can help maintain normal cholesterol levels.

In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers from Penn State University found that people who participated in the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) Study, maintained healthy blood cholesterol levels while consuming a dietary pattern rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts and beans, with lean beef as the primary protein source. The BOLD diets contained 4-5.4 oz (weights before cooking) of lean beef daily, while providing less than 7% of calories from saturated fat, consistent with current fat intake targets. The BOLD study is the latest addition to the body of evidence that supports including lean beef in a heart-healthy diet. In fact, over 20 studies of lean beef in healthy dietary patterns support a role for lean beef in a heart healthy diet and lifestyle. Learn more by clicking here.

Lean Beef – A Super Satisfying Balance of Taste and Nutrition

If you are looking to celebrate Heart Month with something a little more lean, you are in luck. Beef has that too! What does lean mean? A cut of cooked fresh meat is considered “lean” when it contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 mg of cholesterol per 100 grams (3½ oz) and per RACC (Reference Amount Customarily Consumed), which is 85 grams (3 oz). Per 100 grams: Less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol. Odds are that you’re probably already cooking lean cuts at home or choosing one when dining out. Good for you! A telltale sign that a cut is lean is if the word “Round” or “Loin” is in the name—that’s quite a lot of cuts if you think about it!  In fact, thanks to enhancements in cattle breeding and feeding as well as improved trimming practices, more than 60 percent of whole muscle beef cuts found in the supermarket are considered lean when cooked with visible fat trimmed.1 Learn more about lean beef here.

The Nutrients You Need with a Taste You Love

When it comes to beef and your health, you can rest easy knowing that along with being delicious, beef contains important nutrients that your body needs. In just one 3 oz. cooked serving, you’re getting 10 essential nutrients, including about half your Daily Value for protein! Learn more about the nutrients in beef by clicking here.

Need Some Heart-Healthy Recipe Inspiration?

Enjoying lean beef in a heart-healthy lifestyle is easier than you think with these recipes featuring lean beef, fresh fruit and vegetables, and whole grains. These Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. recipes are all certified by the American Heart Association®. Click here for the recipe collection.

Fancy Night In: Filet Mignon with Mushroom Wine Sauce

And finally, because sometimes you just need a delicious meal to celebrate your Valentine on Valentine’s Day, Brooke from Brooke Appetit has the perfect solution. She created a delicious dinner for two for the Arizona Beef blog. She does a great job of giving you all the details so the shopping and preparation are easy to follow with a big payoff. Your mate will be extremely impressed with your culinary skills. Click here for the full recipe.

Tips and Tricks for an Easy Holiday with Beef

There are lot of tips and tricks out there so we wanted to compile them into one page for your ease. We know the holidays are stressful and we want to help take a little bit of pressure off. These tips will cover things from food safety and help with your Prime Rib Roast, to ideas for before and after the big holiday meal. We hope you have a very Merry Christmas and can’t wait to chat with you in a great New Year!

Prime Rib Roast Tips:

  • Check out our Simple and Easy Prime Rib Roast Recipe by clicking here.
  • When picking a Prime Rib Roast, I like to choose one with a large Ribeye Cap. That’s the highly-marbled part of the roast that “hugs” the eye of the Ribeye on the outside. It’s my favorite part because it tastes like “beef candy.” (tip from our executive director Lauren)
  • Bone-in vs boneless: Bone-in cuts of beef draw more flavor from the bones. Plus, the Prime Rib bones are DELICIOUS and your guests may fight over them. But if you have a boneless roast, that’s ok! It will save you one step when carving.
  • How many pounds of beef do you need? You could use plan on ½ pound per person (uncooked weight) as a guide.
  • Following proper food safety defrosting instructions is very important. If your roast is frozen, plan for plenty of time for the roast to defrost in the refrigerator (NOT at room temperature on your counter). Here are some food safety and defrosting tips.
  • “Stripping” fresh rosemary and thyme: Unless you want to pluck each leaf individually, easily and quickly strip the leaves off the stems by pinching the stem end with one hand and swipe down the length of the stem with your fingers on your other hand.
  • Allowing the Prime Rib to rest for 15-20 minutes is very important. Be patient to allow the juices to re-absorb into the meat ensuring a tender, juicy roast. Those few extra minutes provide a great opportunity to make an au jus from the reserved beef drippings and plate side dishes.
  • For more beef recipe inspiration and tips, visit Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.’s Expert Tips for the Perfect Holiday RoastAll About the Prime Rib and Beef Up the Holidays.

Meal Ideas for Before and After Christmas Dinner:

  • Best Brunch Recipes: It might be the morning or the day after Christmas, but you and your family are still going to be hungry. This link takes you to a collection of easy-to-prepare brunch recipes that are a delicious way to keep everyone content.
  • Holiday Appetizers: Be warned – once you serve these bad boys you’ll be on appetizer duty for life. From handheld cocktail hour bites to low-key yet festive pre-dinner snacks, these are sure to please.

Creating the Atmosphere:

  • While you’re sitting down to enjoy your Prime Rib Roast on Christmas Day, have the Beef Drool Log playing in the background to set the ambiance.
  • This special beef dinner isn’t complete without a bold red wine pairing! A robust cabernet, like Louis M. Martini’s Sonoma County Cabernet, pairs perfectly with beef, and to make holiday shopping easy, Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. and Louis M. Martini partnered to offer a $15 rebate. Just buy two bottles of Louis M. Martini wine and a Prime Rib Roast and at your local grocery store in states where legal.
  • With smaller gatherings, leftovers are more likely. The beef experts have you covered there too with effortless recipes that showcase leftover Prime Rib. Try a Beef and Spinach Breakfast Sandwich or the Four-Seasons Beef and Brussels Sprout Chopped Salad to keep the celebration going and enjoy your leftovers the next day.
  • If putting a Prime Rib Roast at the center of the dinner table isn’t enough holiday cheer for you, be sure to check out the latest spin on the Beef Drool Log, “Twas The Night Before Beefmas,” which features a beefy Christmas Eve tale inspired by a true love of beef.

That is a lot of tips, but just in case we missed one or you need even more check out Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. All these tips and more can be found here.

Arizona Beef’s Simple and Easy Prime Rib Roast

This week’s #AZBeef blog post is from Lauren Maehling, the Arizona Beef Council’s Executive Director. She shares with us a delicious and simple Prime Rib recipe that is sure to impress your family this holiday season.


Cooking and serving a perfect Prime Rib for a special occasion was a goal of mine but I was completely intimidated for far too long. Overseeing the quintessential holiday protein highlight is a hefty responsibility. There is a fine line between tragic or magic when it comes to preparing the main course of a special meal, and we want to help you confidently dazzle your guests with a delectable Prime Rib this holiday season. It’s taken me a few years to tinker with a recipe, and I’m honored to share this one with you.

Before we begin, I’d like to suggest a festive video to get you in the roasting spirit: behold, the Drool Log and ‘Twas The Night Before Beefmas.

Now, about this recipe. There are many ways to prepare a Prime Rib Roast that result in an excellent eating experience (BBQ, smoker, roaster, oven, oh my!). This is a simple yet tasty recipe that has become my go-to that I’ve modified and shared with family and friends over the years. Though this recipe calls for oven roasting, it could easily be adapted to another low and slow cooking method. Whether you follow this one or another preferred stand by, I hope you enjoy, and cheers to the beef farmers and ranchers who work year-round to raise delicious and nutritious beef.

Garlic and Herb-Crusted Prime Rib

Notes: Make sure to read the tips at the end. This recipe isn’t an *exact* science (except for the internal temps – don’t wing those!) But the herbs and garlic are approximate and not set in stone. If you have a little more or less rosemary, it’s going to turn out just fine. It’s ok to wing this part. Really like garlic? Keep on peeling and chopping. Tired of meticulously pulling each tiny individual leaf of thyme (or in my case, is your husband tired of plucking each leaf? 😉). If so, call it good (but see the tip about rosemary and thyme to make your life easier). I realize the recipe looks “wordy” but please don’t be intimidated. I wanted to include as much commentary to help the process.

Ingredients

  • Prime Rib Roast (officially called a Ribeye Roast and sometimes called a Standing Rib Roast) – I prefer bone-in but boneless is wonderful also. More about this cut here.
  • Fresh Rosemary: about 8 sprigs or 2 packs if you’re buying it from the market in those little herb packs. Will be about ½ cup chopped. You can use less if you have a small roast.
  • Fresh Thyme: 6-8 sprigs which is one of those herb packs from the market.
  • 2 heads of Garlic: reserve 5-8 cloves. Finely dice the rest.
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Your favorite Steak Seasoning (I like one with salt, pepper, garlic powder and parsley)

Prep Work for Herb Crust

  • Thinly slice lengthwise the 5-8 cloves you set aside (these will be to insert into the roast). Keep these separate from the chopped garlic.
  • Finely chop rosemary, thyme and garlic.
  • Mix together herbs with olive oil to a consistency you could rub all over the roast. It should be the consistency of a thin paste.

Cooking

  • Preheat oven to 500˚F with oven rack in the lower third of the oven (so your roast and roasting pan are sitting in the middle of the oven).
    • Not necessary but a bonus to the Prime Rib cooking experience, tune in to the Drool Log for 2 hours of uninterrupted satisfying sizzle. It will look fabulous on your TV.
  • Make sure roast is dry. Pat with paper towels, if needed.
  • Poke holes approximately 1” into the roast with a paring knife to insert the sliced garlic (tutorial video here). I like to add the garlic all over the top fat cap of the roast. The garlic will add extra flavor, unless you don’t want extra garlic flavor, then you can skip this step.
  • Coat roast with your favorite steak seasoning. How lightly or heavily you season is up to your preference and taste.
  • Now coat the entire roast in the garlic and herb paste. Doesn’t it smell divine?
  • Place the roast bone side down on the rack of your roasting pan. If cooking a boneless roast, make sure the fat side is up. If you don’t have a roasting rack, you can make one like this DIY roasting rack.
  • Insert an oven-proof thermometer, if you have one, into the center or thickest part of the roast, taking care to avoid the bone (if cooking a bone-in roast). I like a digital instant-read thermometer that can be read outside the oven.
  • Now is the time to put this grand roast in the oven! Cook at 500˚ for 20 minutes (preheated, of course, in case you ignored that first step).
    • Keep a watchful eye on the outer crust. If it looks like it is getting too dark (aka burning), loosely cover the roast with a sheet of aluminum foil.
  • After 20 minutes, lower oven temp to 350˚F. 
  • Total cooking time will vary depending on the size of the roast. Plan on 15 minutes per pound of beef. So, if your roast weighs 8 pounds, your total cooking time will be approximately 2 hours. This is approximate as every oven is different, and that’s why it is very important to watch the internal temperature reading. Internal temperature is more important than the time on the clock.
  • Remove roast from the oven when meat thermometer registers 115-120°F for medium rare. As the roast rests (next step), the temperature will continue to rise. Some people like more done and some like more rare. It’s up to your personal preference.
  • Transfer Prime Rib to a cutting board and loosely tent with aluminum foil. Let rest 15-20 minutes. Resting is important – see note below. 
  • Time to carve! First turn the roast on its side and remove the ribs. To do this, follow the curve of the ribs as close and you can making sure to hold the roast steady with a serving fork or tongs. Once the ribs are removed, turn the roast with the fat side up and carefully slice pieces to your desired thickness. I like 1” thick slices, but if you like thinner or thicker, you do you.
  • Enjoy! You’ll have salty and crusty end pieces for the end-piece lovers, and a nice medium rare in the middle for everyone else.

Tips:

  • When picking a Prime Rib Roast, I like to choose one with a large Ribeye Cap. That’s the highly-marbled part of the roast that “hugs” the eye of the Ribeye on the outside. It’s my favorite part because it tastes like “beef candy.”
  • Bone-in vs boneless: Bone-in cuts of beef draw more flavor from the bones. Plus, the Prime Rib bones are DELICIOUS and your guests may fight over them. But if you have a boneless roast, that’s ok! It will save you one step when carving.
  • How many pounds of beef do you need? Plan on ½ pound per person (uncooked weight).
  • Following proper food safety defrosting instructions is very important. If your roast is frozen, plan for plenty of time for the roast to defrost in the refrigerator (NOT at room temperature on your counter). Here are some food safety and defrosting tips.
  • “Stripping” rosemary and thyme: Unless you want to pluck each leaf individually, easily and quickly strip the leaves off the stems by pinching the stem end with one hand and swipe down the length of the stem with your fingers on your other hand.
  • Allowing the Prime Rib to rest for 15-20 minutes is very important. Be patient to allow the juices to re-absorb into the meat ensuring a tender, juicy roast. Those few extra minutes provide a great opportunity to make an au jus from the reserved beef drippings and plate side dishes.
  • For more beef recipe inspiration and tips, visit Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.’s Expert Tips for the Perfect Holiday Roast, All About the Prime Rib and Beef Up the Holidays.

There are many techniques and recipes that result in a delicious Prime Rib. Please share with us in the comments, what is your favorite?

Beef Cooking Lesson: Stewing

The weather forecast is showing cooler temperatures across Arizona in the coming days so now is the perfect time to brush up on your stewing skills. There’s nothing better than a warm, hearty meal after a cold day. Can you say “comfort food?” On top of the good vibes stewing brings, it’s also a fairly simple skill to learn. This is a slow-cooking method, similar to braising, with the key difference being the beef is covered in liquid. Stewing is best done in a heavy stockpot or Dutch oven on the stovetop or in the oven, or in a slow-cooker. Check out the lesson below and be sure to visit Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. for recipes and more cooking lessons.

CUT AND DREDGE

If you’re using pre-packaged (or cutting your own) chunks, make sure they’re not too small to prevent overcooking. Aim for cubes about the size of a golf ball. Many stew recipes call for dredging the beef in seasoned flour before browning.


BROWN THE BEEF

Heat a drizzle of oil in the pan over medium heat and brown the meat on all sides, and drain (unless your recipe says to leave the drippings). You may need to work in batches if using a smaller pan. If you’re using a slow cooker, transfer it over.


ALL TOGETHER NOW

Depending on your recipe, now’s the time to add seasonings, vegetables and liquid — such as beef broth, wine, beer, juice or even water. Bring the liquid to a boil, then reduce heat to low and cover with a tight-fitting lid.


SIMMER AND STEW

Follow your recipe for timing guidelines. Don’t lift the lid — unless your recipe calls for adding vegetables or other ingredients later on. You’ll know it’s done when the beef is fork-tender.



Need some recipe inspiration? Check these out to use your new stewing skills.

Simple Savory Beef Pot Roast

A delicious take on the family dinner classic. Cook a Blade Chuck Roast low and slow, then finish with a frozen veggie blend to save time without sacrificing flavor.




Horseradish-Braised Pot Roast with Barley and Kale

Simmered slowly in nippy horseradish, this Pot Roast recipe is a satisfying change to the typical Sunday supper with the addition of barley and kale.




Yankee Beef Pot Roast

Looking for a classic American recipe? Our cozy Yankee Pot Roast is sure to please in any weather.




Images and recipes courtesy of Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.com.