Arizona Beef’s Simple and Easy Prime Rib Roast

This week’s #AZBeef blog post is from Lauren Maehling, the Arizona Beef Council’s Executive Director. She shares with us a delicious and simple Prime Rib recipe that is sure to impress your family this holiday season.


Cooking and serving a perfect Prime Rib for a special occasion was a goal of mine but I was completely intimidated for far too long. Overseeing the quintessential holiday protein highlight is a hefty responsibility. There is a fine line between tragic or magic when it comes to preparing the main course of a special meal, and we want to help you confidently dazzle your guests with a delectable Prime Rib this holiday season. It’s taken me a few years to tinker with a recipe, and I’m honored to share this one with you.

Before we begin, I’d like to suggest a festive video to get you in the roasting spirit: behold, the Drool Log and ‘Twas The Night Before Beefmas.

Now, about this recipe. There are many ways to prepare a Prime Rib Roast that result in an excellent eating experience (BBQ, smoker, roaster, oven, oh my!). This is a simple yet tasty recipe that has become my go-to that I’ve modified and shared with family and friends over the years. Though this recipe calls for oven roasting, it could easily be adapted to another low and slow cooking method. Whether you follow this one or another preferred stand by, I hope you enjoy, and cheers to the beef farmers and ranchers who work year-round to raise delicious and nutritious beef.

Garlic and Herb-Crusted Prime Rib

Notes: Make sure to read the tips at the end. This recipe isn’t an *exact* science (except for the internal temps – don’t wing those!) But the herbs and garlic are approximate and not set in stone. If you have a little more or less rosemary, it’s going to turn out just fine. It’s ok to wing this part. Really like garlic? Keep on peeling and chopping. Tired of meticulously pulling each tiny individual leaf of thyme (or in my case, is your husband tired of plucking each leaf? 😉). If so, call it good (but see the tip about rosemary and thyme to make your life easier). I realize the recipe looks “wordy” but please don’t be intimidated. I wanted to include as much commentary to help the process.

Ingredients

  • Prime Rib Roast (officially called a Ribeye Roast and sometimes called a Standing Rib Roast) – I prefer bone-in but boneless is wonderful also. More about this cut here.
  • Fresh Rosemary: about 8 sprigs or 2 packs if you’re buying it from the market in those little herb packs. Will be about ½ cup chopped. You can use less if you have a small roast.
  • Fresh Thyme: 6-8 sprigs which is one of those herb packs from the market.
  • 2 heads of Garlic: reserve 5-8 cloves. Finely dice the rest.
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Your favorite Steak Seasoning (I like one with salt, pepper, garlic powder and parsley)

Prep Work for Herb Crust

  • Thinly slice lengthwise the 5-8 cloves you set aside (these will be to insert into the roast). Keep these separate from the chopped garlic.
  • Finely chop rosemary, thyme and garlic.
  • Mix together herbs with olive oil to a consistency you could rub all over the roast. It should be the consistency of a thin paste.

Cooking

  • Preheat oven to 500˚F with oven rack in the lower third of the oven (so your roast and roasting pan are sitting in the middle of the oven).
    • Not necessary but a bonus to the Prime Rib cooking experience, tune in to the Drool Log for 2 hours of uninterrupted satisfying sizzle. It will look fabulous on your TV.
  • Make sure roast is dry. Pat with paper towels, if needed.
  • Poke holes approximately 1” into the roast with a paring knife to insert the sliced garlic (tutorial video here). I like to add the garlic all over the top fat cap of the roast. The garlic will add extra flavor, unless you don’t want extra garlic flavor, then you can skip this step.
  • Coat roast with your favorite steak seasoning. How lightly or heavily you season is up to your preference and taste.
  • Now coat the entire roast in the garlic and herb paste. Doesn’t it smell divine?
  • Place the roast bone side down on the rack of your roasting pan. If cooking a boneless roast, make sure the fat side is up. If you don’t have a roasting rack, you can make one like this DIY roasting rack.
  • Insert an oven-proof thermometer, if you have one, into the center or thickest part of the roast, taking care to avoid the bone (if cooking a bone-in roast). I like a digital instant-read thermometer that can be read outside the oven.
  • Now is the time to put this grand roast in the oven! Cook at 500˚ for 20 minutes (preheated, of course, in case you ignored that first step).
    • Keep a watchful eye on the outer crust. If it looks like it is getting too dark (aka burning), loosely cover the roast with a sheet of aluminum foil.
  • After 20 minutes, lower oven temp to 350˚F. 
  • Total cooking time will vary depending on the size of the roast. Plan on 15 minutes per pound of beef. So, if your roast weighs 8 pounds, your total cooking time will be approximately 2 hours. This is approximate as every oven is different, and that’s why it is very important to watch the internal temperature reading. Internal temperature is more important than the time on the clock.
  • Remove roast from the oven when meat thermometer registers 115-120°F for medium rare. As the roast rests (next step), the temperature will continue to rise. Some people like more done and some like more rare. It’s up to your personal preference.
  • Transfer Prime Rib to a cutting board and loosely tent with aluminum foil. Let rest 15-20 minutes. Resting is important – see note below. 
  • Time to carve! First turn the roast on its side and remove the ribs. To do this, follow the curve of the ribs as close and you can making sure to hold the roast steady with a serving fork or tongs. Once the ribs are removed, turn the roast with the fat side up and carefully slice pieces to your desired thickness. I like 1” thick slices, but if you like thinner or thicker, you do you.
  • Enjoy! You’ll have salty and crusty end pieces for the end-piece lovers, and a nice medium rare in the middle for everyone else.

Tips:

  • When picking a Prime Rib Roast, I like to choose one with a large Ribeye Cap. That’s the highly-marbled part of the roast that “hugs” the eye of the Ribeye on the outside. It’s my favorite part because it tastes like “beef candy.”
  • Bone-in vs boneless: Bone-in cuts of beef draw more flavor from the bones. Plus, the Prime Rib bones are DELICIOUS and your guests may fight over them. But if you have a boneless roast, that’s ok! It will save you one step when carving.
  • How many pounds of beef do you need? Plan on ½ pound per person (uncooked weight).
  • Following proper food safety defrosting instructions is very important. If your roast is frozen, plan for plenty of time for the roast to defrost in the refrigerator (NOT at room temperature on your counter). Here are some food safety and defrosting tips.
  • “Stripping” rosemary and thyme: Unless you want to pluck each leaf individually, easily and quickly strip the leaves off the stems by pinching the stem end with one hand and swipe down the length of the stem with your fingers on your other hand.
  • Allowing the Prime Rib to rest for 15-20 minutes is very important. Be patient to allow the juices to re-absorb into the meat ensuring a tender, juicy roast. Those few extra minutes provide a great opportunity to make an au jus from the reserved beef drippings and plate side dishes.
  • For more beef recipe inspiration and tips, visit Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.’s Expert Tips for the Perfect Holiday Roast, All About the Prime Rib and Beef Up the Holidays.

There are many techniques and recipes that result in a delicious Prime Rib. Please share with us in the comments, what is your favorite?

Beef Cooking Lesson: Stewing

The weather forecast is showing cooler temperatures across Arizona in the coming days so now is the perfect time to brush up on your stewing skills. There’s nothing better than a warm, hearty meal after a cold day. Can you say “comfort food?” On top of the good vibes stewing brings, it’s also a fairly simple skill to learn. This is a slow-cooking method, similar to braising, with the key difference being the beef is covered in liquid. Stewing is best done in a heavy stockpot or Dutch oven on the stovetop or in the oven, or in a slow-cooker. Check out the lesson below and be sure to visit Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. for recipes and more cooking lessons.

CUT AND DREDGE

If you’re using pre-packaged (or cutting your own) chunks, make sure they’re not too small to prevent overcooking. Aim for cubes about the size of a golf ball. Many stew recipes call for dredging the beef in seasoned flour before browning.


BROWN THE BEEF

Heat a drizzle of oil in the pan over medium heat and brown the meat on all sides, and drain (unless your recipe says to leave the drippings). You may need to work in batches if using a smaller pan. If you’re using a slow cooker, transfer it over.


ALL TOGETHER NOW

Depending on your recipe, now’s the time to add seasonings, vegetables and liquid — such as beef broth, wine, beer, juice or even water. Bring the liquid to a boil, then reduce heat to low and cover with a tight-fitting lid.


SIMMER AND STEW

Follow your recipe for timing guidelines. Don’t lift the lid — unless your recipe calls for adding vegetables or other ingredients later on. You’ll know it’s done when the beef is fork-tender.



Need some recipe inspiration? Check these out to use your new stewing skills.

Simple Savory Beef Pot Roast

A delicious take on the family dinner classic. Cook a Blade Chuck Roast low and slow, then finish with a frozen veggie blend to save time without sacrificing flavor.




Horseradish-Braised Pot Roast with Barley and Kale

Simmered slowly in nippy horseradish, this Pot Roast recipe is a satisfying change to the typical Sunday supper with the addition of barley and kale.




Yankee Beef Pot Roast

Looking for a classic American recipe? Our cozy Yankee Pot Roast is sure to please in any weather.




Images and recipes courtesy of Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.com.

You Can Always Come Back to the Kitchen: Foodservice Challenges Due to COVID-19

The foodservice industry, an important sector of the beef community, has been drastically affected by COVID-19. Join Jessica Obie, a center of plate specialist with US Foods®, to learn about the challenges and how restaurateurs have pivoted to succeed.

With 15 years of industry experience, Jessica’s career knowledge includes menu creation, food testing, cooking, management, and sales. Jessica is competent in the high demands of the kitchen and builds long-term, productive, and mutually beneficial relationships with customers. In her role, she provides profitable beef, seafood, poultry, and pork solutions for customers. Jessica received a Master of Brand Advantages from Certified Angus Beef.

In 2013, after working 13 years within the confines of restaurant walls, I made the bold decision to go into food sales. Naturally, being terrified about this uncertain, the sky is the limit, fully commission based so-you-better-hustle decision, I consulted my chef mentor (the one who used to make me stutter with fear). Not only did she support the idea of testing a new path, but she also offered the comforting words “you can always come back to the kitchen.”

In the years since, as I rode the roller coaster of success with the sales industry, her words held true and I was always able to rely on my experience in the kitchen to bridge commission paydays, while chasing dreams and keeping my culinary skills sharp.

That was until early spring of 2020. I watched in alarm the shutdown and futuristic uncertainty of the industry that had helped raise me. My fellow restaurant brethren/work families current and past were suddenly out of work, many of them never knowing another path than serving or cooking. For some, their future is still uncertain as they wait for their restaurants/hotels to re-open.

Unfortunately, ‘the new-norm’ may continue to prevent these cooks/servers/chefs/owners from going back to life as they knew it. Those who sat waiting on their heels, thinking life would return to normal will be left behind. But…those who saw this slow down/shut down as a reset button, took the time to stop, evaluate themselves and their business, and those that adapted to the situation, will persevere.

Masks are the new norm but brands are coming up with fun ways to embrace the change.

Social media presence, online ordering and conscientious dining have gained popularity over the last decade, but some still refused to embrace it. As in-room dining closed and “to-go” became the only option, those who had already embraced or even dipped their toes in the pond of these concepts could recover quicker. Those who embraced social media and kept their customers in the loop with updated hours, sanitation methods and ease of ordering are feeling the effect of COVID-19 less than those who didn’t and aren’t. Some are even seeing year over year increases. Now more than ever, social media is playing a vital part in the success of businesses. Adaptability, perseverance and reliance on outside resources are more important than ever. No one can survive this on their own.

As millennials were finally forced to stay at home and, even worse, cook for themselves, they finally realized they could do it. With so many people now working from home, more families have time to cook their own meals and not just grab something on the way home. What does this mean for our restaurants who want to successfully emerge from the other side of this? Their food must be more original, more consistent, and healthier than what I can provide for myself. If they don’t provide a reason why someone should leave their house or open their pandemic-depleted wallet, consumers will order in their groceries and stay put. As more people have time to “Google” nutrition facts, humane practices, sustainability policies, etc., they will only shop/buy from stores and restaurants who share their beliefs.

Jessica getting back to her roots which lay in the kitchen.

Originally ‘gifting’ toilette paper with orders of $50 or more was popular. Now 6 months later, DIY meal kits, speed scratch and tamper evident seals/packaging is most important. With less and less people dining in-house, ghost kitchens (renting space in an industrial kitchen) and multi-concept spaces are popping up and they are all focusing on to-go. Using smarter products and packaging that hold integrity from restaurant to home has become vital. US Foods® offers restaurant operators market and inventory analysis to determine the most financially responsible ‘new’ concepts possible from their current production line.

In the end, I guess Chef Cheryl (previously mentioned fear-instilling mentor) was correct. I did come back to the kitchen, though not as a paid employee. I was fortunate enough to use these months as a reset and get back to my culinary roots. I, as a culinarian, remembered the joy in cooking and used that to spend time with family, neighbors and friends. I, as a millennial, will only order out if it is something fun, exciting or healthier than I can create. And, I, working from home, have more time to research, try and grow my own food. 

We are all in this together, but we all need to learn to adapt and grow.

As an additional educational resource to their customers during these changing times, US Foods has provided weekly webinars (link) to help provide on-going information and learning opportunities to the restaurant community.

Brooke Appetit: Beef Shish Kabobs with Lebanese Rice

Arizona Beef is delighted to welcome Brooke Appetit back to share another delicious recipe. This one is easy, colorful, and delicious. Read on!

“As our Arizona weather is starting to get nicer (maybe a little?) I love to spend my evenings outside grilling!  Marinated shish kabobs are easy to prepare, fast cooking, and perfect for entertaining. We are using Sirloin for this recipe. Sirloin is less expensive and is a great option because of it’s lean but beefy flavor. If you allow it a few more hours in the marinade, you will be sure to have tender and flavorful kabobs! I like to pair the kabobs with a Lebanese rice that is also easy and delicious. Enjoy!” – Brooke Gladden

Beef Shish Kabobs

Ingredients:

¾ cup vegetable oil or olive oil
¾ cup soy sauce
½ cup lemon juice
1/3  cup Worcestershire
¼ cup mustard
¼ cup honey
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp fresh chopped herbs (I used oregano, basil, rosemary and parsley)
1 ½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons coarsely cracked black pepper
1 ½ lbs Top Sirloin*, cut into 1 inch cubes
Vegetables – cut into chunks
16 mushroom caps
1 large red onion
1 green bell pepper
1 red bell pepper
1 yellow bell pepper
1 orange bell pepper
1 zucchini
1 yellow squash

*Don’t have Top Sirloin? Try these steak swaps for alternate beef cut options that also work well for kabobs.

Method:

1. Whisk the oil, soy sauce, lemon juice, Worcestershire, mustard, honey, garlic, fresh herbs, salt and pepper together in a bowl. Pour half into a resealable plastic bag. Add the beef, coat with the marinade and seal the bag. Marinate in the refrigerator for 6 hours or overnight.

2. A few hours before you are ready to grill add vegetables into a resealable plastic bag and coat with the marinade.

3. Thread pieces of vegetables and beef onto metal skewers.

4. Preheat grill to high heat. You can reduce the heat to medium-high once you put the kabobs on but starting them with a high heat will allow for a nice char. Grill kabobs, turning every 2-3 minutes until all sides have a nice char. I typically grill mine for 8-10 minutes total. Be careful to not overcook the meat. In my opinion, they are best when medium-rare!

Lebanese rice

Ingredients:
1 cup white rice
½ cup vermicelli
1 tbsp olive oil
1 ½  tbsp butter
1 teaspoon salt
2 ¼ cups water
½ cup toasted pine nuts, toast in 1 tbsp butter

Method

  1. In a non-stick pot, heat olive oil and butter on medium-high heat.
  2. Add the vermicelli and continuously stir to toast it evenly. Vermicelli should turn a nice golden brown but be careful, it burns quickly.
  3. Once vermicelli is brown add the rice and stir for about 30 seconds.
  4. Season with salt.
  5. Add 2 ¼ cups water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pot and cook for 15 minutes.
  6. When the rice is fully cooked, remove from the heat and fluff with a fork.
  7. Serve warm with toasted pine nuts on top

About Brooke

Brooke Gladden is a native Arizonian who grew up in a small ex mining town north of Tucson called San Manuel. She attended the University of Arizona graduating with a B.S. in Agriculture Communications.  She currently lives in Palo Verde, AZ with her husband Clint who is a fourth generation farmer at Gladden Farms/ Saddle Mountain Dairy.

She’s a total foodie at heart and normally plans her days around meals. Brooke’s mom (Jacque Phelps) gave her a passion for cooking. She is a wonderful cook who Brooke has had the privilege to learn from while growing up. She says her favorite thing in the world is cooking with my mom.

Check out her website Brooke Appetit for more recipe inspiration and be sure to follow her on Instagram.

Arizona Beef and Brad Prose of Chiles and Smoke Giveaway

Please note the giveaway is now closed but please enjoy the recipe below.

Labor Day is coming up quickly and we want to be ready to tackle the grill confidently and in style! To do that, we’ve partnered with someone who celebrates beef often and creates delicious recipes to bring you a yummy giveaway. Brad Prose is a Phoenix-born family man, professional recipe developer, food writer, and culinary photographer – the force behind Chiles and Smoke. His combined passion for fine dining and BBQ shines through his presentations and cooking style. Brad uses social media, the website, and his brand to share his passion and story to inspire new ideas. Not only is he helping us with this giveaway but he also put together a taco recipe just for your enjoyment!

Lots of beefy prizes including gift cards to Omaha Steaks. Photo by Hazel Light Photography.

Giveaway details first.

What do you get?

Grand Prize receives a United We Steak puzzle, tongs, koozie, apron, lighter, and a $100 Omaha Steak gift card.

2nd Prize receives a United We Steak puzzle, tongs, koozie, apron, lighter, and a $50 Omaha Steak gift card.

3rd Prize receives a United We Steak puzzle, tongs, koozie, apron, lighter, and a $25 Omaha Steak gift card.

You have three chances to win! And the steps to enter are easy.

Here’s what you need to do to be eligible for this giveaway.

1- Like this post (LINK) on Instagram.

2- Comment on the same post (LINK) telling us your favorite cut of beef to grill.

3- Like @ArizonaBeef and @ChilesandSmoke on Instagram.

4- Finally, head over to this LINK to fill out a quick entry form.

The contest starts on August 28, 2020 and runs until midnight, Eastern Standard Time, on September 3, 2020.

And now for the recipe!

Ancho Coffee Skirt Steak Tacos

Welcome to Ancho Coffee Skirt Steak Tacos, your gateway to a simple recipe with a huge blast of flavor without much hassle. Amazing salsa, too! You can cook both back to back to save time.

Ingredients
  • Omaha Steaks Skirt Steak, approx 14oz (learn more about Skirt Steak here)
  • 2 Tbsp finely ground coffee
  • 2 Tbsp ancho chile powder
  • 1 Tbsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • Zest of 1 lime
CREAMY CORN SALSA
  • 2 ears corn
  • 1 Cup Mexican crema (or sour cream, mayo)
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded, diced finely
  • 1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 1/2 medium white onion
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 Tbsp Ancho Coffee Rub to season
  • 12 Corn Tortillas

Instructions
  1. Heat up the grill to medium-high heat, around 400-450F.
  2. Mix the rub ingredients together, taste and adjust. Slice the Skirt Steak in half, so you have 2 shorter pieces. This allows you to easily fit both on the grill. Season the Skirt Steaks well and allow the meat to rest while you start the corn.
  3. Grill the corn, turning to char each side if desired. This will take between 6-8 minutes. While the corn is grilling, prepare the other vegetables for the salsa.
  4. Take the corn off the grill and allow them to cool. Place the Skirt Steaks on the grill, do not disturb for 2-3 minutes until it has a nice char. Flip, repeat, and check the temperature for your desired cook. I prefer to grill until 130 for Medium Rare, knowing it will continue to rise as it rests.
  5. The steak is resting, go ahead and cut off the corn kernels.  Mix the corn and the other ingredients together, using the Ancho Coffee Rub to season it. You might need more seasoning depending on your taste.
  6. (Optional) Toss the tortillas on the grill for 1 minute each side for an extra char.
  7. Serve in tortillas, with the salsa.
Notes

Use a coffee that tastes good to you! I prefer dark roast for grilling, but any kind will work. There’s 1 lime in the recipe, make sure you zest it for the rub, then juice it for the salsa.


Enjoy the recipe, enter the contest and get ready for to unite with close family and friends around the grill!

College Student Approved Recipe: Easy Roast Beef Potluck Rolls

This blog post was written by our 2019 Senior Arizona Beef Ambassador Savannah Burt. Arizona Beef Ambassadors are passionate youth advocates for the Arizona beef industry. The winners are the official youth representatives of the Arizona State Cowbelles (ASC) and the beef community. The senior winner travels the state sharing the story of beef from pasture to plate with consumers and students. Savannah is a current college student and explains below how an easy-to-cook-and-prepare recipe is a must for her.


As a busy college student who also lives in a dorm, most of my meals must meet certain criteria. First, it has to be easy to make. Second, it must be inexpensive. Finally, it must be portable. Luckily, this recipe meets every single requirement, and it centers around my favorite source of protein: beef! These roast beef potluck rolls were originally featured on BeefItsWhatsforDinner.com, and they’re as nutritious as they are delicious! The recipe makes 12 servings, each with 21 grams of protein, so it’s perfect for storing in the fridge and eating over a few days or bringing to gatherings with friends or family! Without any further ado, here’s the recipe for roast beef potluck rolls, complete with some tips and tricks from the last time I made it.

Ingredients:
1 pound thinly sliced reduced-sodium deli roast beef
1 package Hawaiian rolls (12 count)
1/4 cup cream-style prepared horseradish
6 slices reduced-fat provolone cheese
1/3 cup butter, melted
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon dried parsley leaves
2 teaspoons packed light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon onion powder

Cooking:

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Coat 9 x 13-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Cut rolls in half, horizontally.

Place the bottom half of the rolls in the baking dish. Spread horseradish on the cut side, and top with roast beef and cheese. Close the sandwiches with the other half of the rolls.

Use a paring knife to cut the rolls into 12 sandwiches. Use your hands to spread the sandwiches apart.

Mix together butter, Worcestershire sauce, parsley, sugar, and onion powder in a small bowl. Pour the mixture evenly over the sandwiches. Take a spoon and spread the mixture over the top of the rolls.

Make sure they’re all generously coated! Cover the dish and refrigerate 1 hour to overnight.

Bake the sandwiches, uncovered, in the 350°F oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and the rolls are golden brown.

Once the sandwiches are out of the oven, you can combine them with a nice salad or side dish for a mouthwatering meal! The possibilities are endless, and this savory recipe is at the top of my favorites list!

To learn more about the Arizona Beef Ambassador and the program visit the Arizona State Cowbelles’ website here.

Beef Stroganoff by Brooke Appetit

Phoenix temps dropped below 80 so naturally I pull out all the creamy, cozy, fall recipes I have. Beef Stroganoff is my go to! It’s a dinner that has been around for ages but this traditional dish is perfect for the change in season. Tender strips of beef with a creamy seasoned mushroom sauce, finished off over fluffy egg noodles.  Hands down I could not think of a better November meal than this cozy dish. I LOVE this recipe. Best part? It’s SO easy. It’s my husband’s favorite dish that I make, so you can usually find it on my fall night weekly rotation! Make this soon and enjoy it…..preferably with extra beef and sauce too. Thanks for stopping by!

-XOXO, Brooke Appetit

Ingredients

½ lb white mushrooms, sliced
1 medium onion, sliced
4 tablespoons butter
2 pounds sirloin steak (sliced in strips ¼  to ½ inch thick)
3 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon garlic salt
½ teaspoon onion salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon paprika
2 garlic cloves, minced
½ cup sherry
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 can beef consommé
¾ cup sour cream

Method

  • Sauté mushrooms, onion and garlic in 2 tablespoons of butter on medium – high heat for 4-5 minutes until onions are translucent, remove from skillet.
  • Melt remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to skillet and brown meat. (Don’t overcrowd your pan) While meat is browning season with salt, pepper, garlic salt, onion salt and paprika.
  • Sprinkle flour, cook for 30 seconds
  • Add tomato paste, cook for 1-2 minutes.
  • Add sherry, let simmer until reduced by half then add beef consommé.
  • Simmer for 1 ¼ hours or until the beef is tender.
  • Add sour cream and combine, add sautéed onions, mushrooms and garlic.
  • Serve hot over egg noodles and garnish with parsley!

St. Patrick’s Day: Celebrate with Beef

Green beer and corned beef day is just around the corner! While you don’t need a recipe for the beer, we can help with the directions on the corned beef. Plus ideas for breakfast and lunch the next day! Bonus: A perfect beef-y brunch drink is included in our recipe round up!

Slow-Cooked Corned Beef in Beer with Red Currant-Mustard Sauce

Let your slow cooker do all the work for this complete meal of beer-braised Corned Beef with fresh cabbage and red potatoes. It’s a great dish for your next celebration.

Dijon-Glazed Corned Beef with Savory Cabbage and Red Potatoes

While Corned Beef braises in the oven, cabbage wedges and potatoes are roasted for a full meal. A bonus recipe for the leftovers is included too!

Corned Beef Brisket with Roasted Vegetables and Lemon-Mustard Sauce

Cook once, dine twice. Enjoy Corned Beef Brisket with roasted carrots, parsnips, cabbage and a lemony sauce tonight, then spin the leftovers into a savory salad tomorrow.

Bloody Bull

Try this brunch favorite with a depth of flavor only beef can provide. Roasted Beef Stock is the secret ingredient to this one of a kind Bloody Mary. Garnish with a beef slider, beef meatball, or whatever you can dream up.

Corned Beef Hash

Tied with the Reuben for the ultimate expression of Corned Beef. Here it’s diced, skillet-cooked with cubed potatoes and thinly sliced leeks, and ideally topped with an egg.

Classic Beef Reuben Sandwich

Try this deli classic for lunch or dinner today. Thinly sliced deli Corned Beef or Pastrami is sandwiched between rye bread with sauerkraut and a tangy home-made dressing.

All photos courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

Cattle Byproducts: More Than Just Beef

What do footballs, lipstick, charcoal, paint, and wallpaper have in common? They are all important items we use in our lives and they all come from cattle.

These guys, they are more than just beef! Photo by Dan Bell.

Wait, what? Yup, you heard us! Those items all contain an ingredient from cattle which we call a by-product. The main reason we raise cattle is for the delicious beef they produce. What is left over is called a byproduct. While the word byproduct might sound like something that isn’t useful, don’t let the word deceive you. These items are extremely important to many of the everyday items you use at home.

You can think of it as a recipe. Just like you have a recipe to make, let’s say, meatloaf, there is a recipe to make lipstick, or footballs, or paint. The recipe provides you the ingredient list and the steps to get you to the end product. The byproducts from beef are one of those ingredients on the list.

Just like this Summertime Meat Loaf has a recipe so do other products!
Photo and recipe courtesy of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

When we harvest a beef animal, about 60% of that animal becomes beef. The remaining 40% includes things like skin, fat, bones, tendons, organs, etc. Here is where byproducts become especially important. We can’t waste half an animal! But we can use those items in inventive and innovative ways to help make our lives easier.

An obvious byproduct is leather. It comes from the cow’s hide. Cowhides are an important part of most of America’s popular sports. One cowhide can make 12 basketballs OR 144 baseballs OR 20 footballs OR 18 volleyballs OR 18 soccer balls OR 12 baseball gloves.

Gelatin is another great example of a beef byproduct. It comes from connective tissue and is a staple ingredient in anything that jiggles or has that well known springy consistency. Hello Jello and gummy bears! Marshmallows and gum are two other products which contain gelatin.

Photo from BBC News.

It’s not just yummy products which contain cattle byproducts. Many important medical items also contain these useful items. Ointments for burns and first aid creams use byproducts as an ingredient along with extremely important antirejection drugs, which are used when someone has a heart, liver, or other organ transplants. The sticky part on bandages can be made from the fatty acid.

Photo by Cattle Empire‘s blog on cattle byproducts.

Other items which contain beef byproducts are insulin, dog food, rawhide bones, laundry pre-treatment, bone china, toilet paper (to make it soft), glue, dish soap, candles, film, crayons, paintbrushes, printing ink, nail polish remover, deodorants, antifreeze, hydraulic brake fluid, car wax, highways, tires, and so much more!

Add this to the list of reasons why cattle are amazing animals. They take sunlight which was used by plants we cannot eat and turn it into delicious and nutritious beef and all of these things we use to help make life easier. Thank goodness for cows!

Graphic by Cattle Tales.

12 Days of Beef-y Recipes

The big day isn’t far away (we won’t remind you of just how few days you have left to shop) and we thought you might be searching for ideas on what to serve your holiday guests. We’ve compiled a list of 12 beef-y recipes, ranging from appetizers to the main course and everything in between! You may not have your Christmas shopping done, but at least you’ll know what’s on the menu!

Mini Meatball Appetizers with Apricot Dipping Sauce

They’re bite size. They’re delicious. Tooth pick worthy and hungry guest approved.

Tiny Taco Beef Tarts

Okay. Let’s be real here. Who doesn’t love a good taco? Make it tiny, self-contained, and bite-sized and people are going to flip! Shake it up with different toppings such as guacamole, sour cream, and salsa. ¡Feliz Navidad!

Teriyaki Steak Skewers

Because anything you can serve on a stick is a great idea for appetizers. Well, maybe not anything. But these Teriyaki Steak Skewers – they are definitely a good idea.

Beef and Couscous Stuffed Baby Bell Peppers

Some are trying to stay on track with healthy eating during the holiday season. Not us. But other people. For those folks (and really everyone else), try out these bad boys. They are bite size and low cal disguised as delicious!

Cranberry Balsamic Roast Beef

This holiday season, impress your guests with this delicious Cranberry Balsamic Roast Beef! A little tangy, a little sweet and a whole lot of mouthwatering. Perfect to feed a crowd!

Braised Beef Short Ribs with Pecan Pomegranate Tabbouleh

For Chef Justin Turner’s vision of a Texan beef centerpiece combines a signature low-and-slow braise with a Southern riff on tabbouleh—a bejeweled side dish studded with pomegranates and local pecans and designed around easy entertaining. Yum.

All About Prime Rib

This is what you’ve been waiting for. The center of the plate. The crown jewel of any self respecting Christmas smorgasbord. The prime rib. This one isn’t really a recipe, per say, but it’s a resource to help you ensure your prime rib is perfect and has people day dreaming about it well into the new year.

Tamale Pie

Here in the Southwest, tamales are a holiday tradition. Some are talented at the construction and execution of making tamales, while the majority of us are at the will and mercy of those talented tamale makers to provide these delicious corn husk wrapped delicacies. When you are in a pinch, and just need that tamale fix, give this one a whirl!

Caprese Steak Salad

Thinking ahead (i.e. the day after Christmas) you might crave something a little lighter. This salad is fresh, perfect for the leftover roast, and gives you an opportunity to add some greens back into your world.

Sunny’s Sunset Park Noodle Bowl

The holidays are a great time to spend with family and friends. And their germs. Sunny Anderson cooks up this recipe when she starts to feel under the weather because it’s warm, helps to relieve congestion, and is easy to make.

Ribeye Hash

What do you do with all the leftovers?! Make a hash! Costco has a lot of great beef ideas, but this is one of our favorites. No one likes a food waster.

Peanut Butter, Chocolate-Hazelnut and Chocolate Chip Beef Jerky Cookies 

Wait! Before you click out of this blog post because you are looking at the title of this recipe saying, “They’ve finally lost it over there at the beef office,” give this one a chance. These cookies are an excellent way to sneak some extra protein into your diet through an unlikely source.

From all of us to all of you, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!