12 Days of Beef-y Recipes

The big day isn’t far away (we won’t remind you of just how few days you have left to shop) and we thought you might be searching for ideas on what to serve your holiday guests. We’ve compiled a list of 12 beef-y recipes, ranging from appetizers to the main course and everything in between! You may not have your Christmas shopping done, but at least you’ll know what’s on the menu!

Mini Meatball Appetizers with Apricot Dipping Sauce

They’re bite size. They’re delicious. Tooth pick worthy and hungry guest approved.

Tiny Taco Beef Tarts

Okay. Let’s be real here. Who doesn’t love a good taco? Make it tiny, self-contained, and bite-sized and people are going to flip! Shake it up with different toppings such as guacamole, sour cream, and salsa. ¡Feliz Navidad!

Teriyaki Steak Skewers

Because anything you can serve on a stick is a great idea for appetizers. Well, maybe not anything. But these Teriyaki Steak Skewers – they are definitely a good idea.

Beef and Couscous Stuffed Baby Bell Peppers

Some are trying to stay on track with healthy eating during the holiday season. Not us. But other people. For those folks (and really everyone else), try out these bad boys. They are bite size and low cal disguised as delicious!

Cranberry Balsamic Roast Beef

This holiday season, impress your guests with this delicious Cranberry Balsamic Roast Beef! A little tangy, a little sweet and a whole lot of mouthwatering. Perfect to feed a crowd!

Braised Beef Short Ribs with Pecan Pomegranate Tabbouleh

For Chef Justin Turner’s vision of a Texan beef centerpiece combines a signature low-and-slow braise with a Southern riff on tabbouleh—a bejeweled side dish studded with pomegranates and local pecans and designed around easy entertaining. Yum.

All About Prime Rib

This is what you’ve been waiting for. The center of the plate. The crown jewel of any self respecting Christmas smorgasbord. The prime rib. This one isn’t really a recipe, per say, but it’s a resource to help you ensure your prime rib is perfect and has people day dreaming about it well into the new year.

Tamale Pie

Here in the Southwest, tamales are a holiday tradition. Some are talented at the construction and execution of making tamales, while the majority of us are at the will and mercy of those talented tamale makers to provide these delicious corn husk wrapped delicacies. When you are in a pinch, and just need that tamale fix, give this one a whirl!

Caprese Steak Salad

Thinking ahead (i.e. the day after Christmas) you might crave something a little lighter. This salad is fresh, perfect for the leftover roast, and gives you an opportunity to add some greens back into your world.

Sunny’s Sunset Park Noodle Bowl

The holidays are a great time to spend with family and friends. And their germs. Sunny Anderson cooks up this recipe when she starts to feel under the weather because it’s warm, helps to relieve congestion, and is easy to make.

Ribeye Hash

What do you do with all the leftovers?! Make a hash! Costco has a lot of great beef ideas, but this is one of our favorites. No one likes a food waster.

Peanut Butter, Chocolate-Hazelnut and Chocolate Chip Beef Jerky Cookies 

Wait! Before you click out of this blog post because you are looking at the title of this recipe saying, “They’ve finally lost it over there at the beef office,” give this one a chance. These cookies are an excellent way to sneak some extra protein into your diet through an unlikely source.

From all of us to all of you, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Professional to Professional: Culinary Instructors Meet Beef Cattle Farmers and Ranchers

In June, sixteen culinary experts from across the country got a taste of the beef industry during the Pasture to Plate Beef Tour, sponsored by beef councils in California, Colorado, Arizona, Oklahoma and Texas. Invited to the checkoff-funded event were the culinary chairs responsible for the 28 International Culinary Schools at the Art Institutes across the country. The non-profit Art Institutes operate the largest system of culinary schools in the United States.

The tour featured a visit to a cow-calf ranch, feedlot and the JBS beef processing facility in northern Colorado, along with presentations from beef experts that helped the culinary leaders understand beef’s role in a sustainable food system, and ideas for incorporating sensory and beef umami exercises into their classrooms. Attendees also had an opportunity to participate in a beef cooking competition that demonstrated their culinary talents.chefs on wagonThe spark for development of this tour was generated last fall during the California Beef Council’s Beef Leadership Summit, according to the CBC’s Christie Van Egmond, director of retail and foodservice marketing, who helped organize the tour. At that time Dave Hendricksen, the national culinary director for the Art Institutes, expressed interest in giving the Institutes’ culinary leaders more backgrounding in the beef industry.

“This is a great way to connect the next generation of chefs with those who produce the food,” Hendricksen said. He said it was “critical” that information this type of event provides gets carried down from the participating culinary leaders to the students in culinary schools studying to be chefs or operation managers.chefs in kitchenStanding out to those attending the tour was the well-being of animals throughout the process, Hendricksen said. “The constant theme of this event was animal welfare and the care for the environment,” he said. “It was amazing.”

Arizona is home to the Arts Institute of Phoenix that includes a large culinary program. The Arizona Beef Council sponsored Chef Noel Ridsdale, culinary program chair, to attend the national tour. Here is Chef Noel’s feedback about his experience.

Chef Noel:

I want to express my deepest gratitude to the Arizona Beef Council for sponsorship of my attendance at the beef checkoff-funded Pasture to Plate Beef Tour for the Art Institutes (AI). This experience was very educational and collaborative in the ways that we were able to connect with the beef council professionals, as well as with each of the AI national directors individually.Noel in kitchenThe tour started on a high note with a tour of a Colorado ranch, with some great knowledge shared by the breeders on how the cattle are treated, the process for the birthing and production management. The aspects of feed analysis and herd health were very interesting. We had dinner on the ranch, and the chef turned out to be an alum of AI, and his selection of items and ways to use beef was very good.

The trip to the packing plant was very interesting. I have been in Certified Angus Beef processing facilities before but never in a mainline producer. This was one of the highlights of the tour for me. I was very interested in the sanitation, inspection process and the zero waste production aspects of the tour. I cut meat myself, but my skills do not match the speed and accuracy of the cutters on the floor there. Watching the entire process enlightened me to the accuracy and technical aspects of production but at the same time still marveled at the human element that is still involved in the process.chefs in Culinary CenterThe science of the feedlot was interesting, and it was great to see that the industry is using green technology by utilizing byproducts of other industries, such as the beer industry. This use of their byproducts as opposed to just corn would add more flavor to the beef.

The presentations on the science of beef and the practical cooking aspects were very good, and our recipes will be featured on www.BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com soon. Overall, experiencing these aspects of beef production gave me additional knowledge that I am able to utilize in my classrooms.

Thank you very much for the opportunity!

Noel G. Ridsdale, MBA, CEC, CCA, AAC

Program Chair – AI Phoenix


Editor’s Note: The Art Institute of Phoenix is closing December 28, 2018 due to unfortunate circumstances. The Arizona Beef Council is glad to have met Chef Noel and we look forward to working with him in his next ventures.

Fancy Night In: Filet Mignon with Mushroom Wine Sauce

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Brooke from Brooke Appetit recently took over our Instagram. She shared a recipe with us and also a little more about the dairy that she and her husband live and work on in Buckeye, Arizona. Her husband, Clint, is a fourth generation farmer at Saddle Mountain Dairy. Clint and his dairy focus on keeping their dairy cows comfortable even during the hottest of months.  Special misters are installed in their cow barns which keep it down to a cool 85 degrees Fahrenheit even when it’s 110 degrees outside.

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Not only is temperature a focus but proper nutrition also sorts itself to the top of the priority list. A mixture of hay, grains, vitamins, and minerals is fed to their cows to ensure they are healthy while producing healthy milk for us to use. To get the full recap of the day, head over to the Arizona Beef Instagram page and check out our highlights. In the meantime, we wanted to make sure you could make Brooke’s delicious creation at home so here is the recipe!

Fancy Night In: Filet Mignon with a Mushroom Wine Sauce

Ingredients
6 Tbsp butter, divided
4 Tbsp olive oil, divided
16 oz baby bella mushrooms, thickly sliced
1 small or 1/2 medium red onion, finely diced
4 medium garlic cloves, minced
2 Tbsp chopped fresh thyme ( reserve a few sprigs for garnish)
4  Beef Filet Mignon steaks (about 2” thick)
1/2 cup a good Cabernet or Merlot you would drink
1 1/2 cups low sodium beef broth
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
Salt and Pepper to taste

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Method
1. Place a large cast iron pan over medium/high heat and melt 3 Tbsp butter and 2 Tbsp oil. Add mushrooms and cook 3-5 minutes until soft. Stir in onion and cook another 3 minutes. Press in garlic cloves then season with salt, pepper, and freshly chopped thyme. Cook another 2 min, stirring constantly until garlic is fragrant, then transfer mushroom mixture to a plate. Wipe the skillet clean with a wet paper towel.


2. Pat dry steaks with a paper towel and season all over with sea salt and cracked
pepper.

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3. Place the same pan over medium/high heat and add 3 Tbsp butter and 2 Tbsp
oil. When butter is hot and finished foaming, add seasoned steaks to skillet,
turning over once with tongs, about 3-5 min per side for medium-rare. To best determine doneness, use an instant-read thermometer and utilize these helpful tips. If steak is browning too fast, reduce heat to medium. Use tongs to transfer steaks to the
plate with mushrooms. Also, keep in mind thinner steaks will cook faster and thicker steaks can take longer.

4. Add 1/2 cup wine and boil until reduced by half (3 minutes), scraping the bottom
with a wooden spoon to deglaze the pan. Add 1 1/2 cups broth and boil until about 2/3 cup liquid remains (5-6 minutes). Add 1/2 cup of cream and boil until sauce thickens slightly (2 minutes). Return mushrooms and steak to the pan and heat until warmed through (1-2 minutes)

Season sauce to taste with more salt & pepper, if desired. Serve immediately. Plate the steak and sauce over some creamy mashed potatoes and a side of steamed asparagus.

6W5A1476Enjoy, friends!

Brooke will be back with us again soon! Stay tuned!

Aspiring Chefs Learn Beef from Gate to Plate

Gate to Plate April 2016_Heidens 1.jpgThe buzz of tour day was in the air this past spring at the University of Arizona’s Maricopa Extension. The buzzing people were 24 culinary students and Chef Chris Wolf, who serves as their instructor at the Arizona Culinary Institute. “At the Arizona Culinary Institute we cover the full spectrum of culinary education, including meat fabrication, so our students are definitely being exposed to various beef, pork, lamb, and poultry cuts already during their time here at school. Our students are generally very excited to broaden their culinary education in any way possible, and the interest in attending this event was amazing. I actually had a WAITING LIST of students to come on the tour. They all had a great time,” reported Chef Wolf when asked about the Institute and their interest in the tour. These students all voluntarily signed up to spend a day learning about the beef lifecycle from a firsthand perspective.

As the day unfolded, with an introduction and high-level overview of the entire beef lifecycle from staff, it was clear there were striking similarities between these students and Arizona beef farmers and ranchers. Both groups are incredibly passionate about what they do. Common ground was easily found after that realization.

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The group toured the JBS – Tolleson plant with Bill Munns, Director of Marketing and Product Management, which gave the students a much better understanding of how a large beef plant works and the high level of safety and science which goes into it. A visit with Paul Heiden at Heiden Land and Cattle was next, providing a better look at the live side of the producing beef. Important discussions continued on many subjects including animal handling and care, water issues, and the controversial topics of antibiotic and growth-promoting technologies.

“I think the value of this tour is obvious: It gives the average person a REAL opportunity to see where their meat is coming from. It’s not a-he said/she said issue, or what they saw online, or what they read somewhere…it’s an actual real-life chance to see the industry in action so that they are educated and can make their own decisions about how they feel about the meat industry,” shared Chef Wolf. “There is no question that this is a worthwhile use of time. The entire tour from start to finish was well managed, educational, and exceeded expectations. I feel that EVERYONE left the tour knowing more than when they began.”

The Arizona Beef Council’s Gate to Plate tour series for nutrition and culinary influencers is made possible by the Federation of State Beef Council’s Federation Initiative Fund.