10 Life Lessons Herd From the Ranch

Raising cattle is a unique experience made up of many hours of hard work and dedication. It’s also a great way to sit back and observe how mother nature can teach you many of the major life lessons you need for a successful life. Enjoy our list of 10 lessons learned on the ranch.

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Photo by David Schafer

1. Those who say only sunshine brings happiness have never danced in the rain.

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Photo by Justin Ladd

2. Water the grass on your side of the fence and then enjoy it.

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Photo by Pat King

3. Respect your elders. They have way more life experience than you do.

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Photo by Roxanne Knight

4. Break the rules sometimes. And then run like heck!

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Photo by Sarah King

5. Trust the right people. Those who make an effort to show you how much they care are a good place to start.

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Photo by Justin Ladd

6. Cultivate and care for your friendships. Your friends are some of the most important people on Earth.

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Photo by Sarah King

7. Sometimes you have to walk a ways to get where you’re going. But don’t give up because the reward is worth the hard work.

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Photo by Scott Graham Bell

8. Set boundaries with people in your life. And when they cross that line, don’t be afraid to let them know!

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Photo by David Schafer

9. Don’t be afraid to stand out from the crowd.

And finally, the most important lesson of them all…

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Photo by David Schafer

10. If you’ve got to pick your nose, make sure no one’s looking.

We hope everyone has a great weekend full of laughs, friends and family, and a whole lot of beef!

Arizona Monsoon Round-Up

Arizona summers are brutal, to say the least, with reprieve arriving only when you catch sight of dark clouds forming on the horizon, smell a hint of moisture in the air, and the mesquite trees start to rustle as a late afternoon wind tickles their branches. The afternoon monsoon has arrived and if you listen closely, you can almost hear the desert sigh in relief.

Monsoon season is a big deal in our state for the average person but proves essential to the cattle rancher. These life-giving rains replenish basin groundwater, recharge riparian areas, give life back to summer grasses, and fill dirt tanks essential for wildlife and cattle alike to survive. Once the rains hit, gone are the days of trucking water to the far reaches of the ranch, as mother nature lifts one small burden off the shoulders of hard-working cattlemen and women.

Enjoy this round-up of Arizona monsoon photos from ranches across the countryside in honor of another monsoon season.

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Photo by Cassie Lyman of the Hat Ranch in Gisela, AZ

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Photo was taken at the Cross B Cattle Ranch in Elgin, AZ

Jolyn

Photo by Jolyn Smith of Texas Canyon Brangus in Dragoon, AZ

Micaela

Photo by Micaela McGibbon of the Santa Rita Ranch outside of Green Valley, AZ

Santana

Photo by Santana Nez of the G Lazy 8 Ranch. Photo was taken in Tucson, AZ.

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Photo by Sarah Henckler King of the King’s Anvil Ranch outside of Tucson, AZ

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Photo by Tina Thompson of the C Bar Ranch in Willcox, AZ

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Photo by Tina Thomson of the C Bar Ranch in Willcox, AZ

The Teacher

18423152_2132355046990808_1853977077406354987_oGaining knowledge and wisdom from an animal is a true blessing and not something every person gets to experience in their lifetime. These lessons are invaluable and often span the distance of a lifetime.  This week, we are excited to welcome back a past contributor to the Arizona Beef Blog, Jolyn Smith of Arizona Ranch Reflections, as she perfectly sums up an invaluable relationship between Paco and her granddaughter, Morgan. Please be sure to visit Jolyn’s Facebook page as she offers beautiful photos of her ranch and words of wisdom we all need.


Originally posted May 15, 2017, Arizona Ranch Reflections

His name is Paco and he is my husbands “retired” ranch horse. They don’t get any better than this one! He is 29 years old this year and he is the best “teacher” anyone could ever have. To say that our oldest grandgirl loves this horse would be an understatement!

Oh, the lessons he’s taught her.

Morgan has learned to watch where he is “looking” because he always spots the cows first. Morgan has learned that she can trust him when he goes up and down the canyons and the mountain picking the best and safest way to go. She has learned she can trust him when they get in a “jam” (according to Morgan, not Paco) and he calmly knows how to handle the situation.

Morgan is learning how to “watch a cow”‘and know what it’s going to do before it does because Paco is a professional at this and she is learning to “feel” what his next move will be. Morgan is learning about obedience because Paco does what she asks of him every time. When she rides one of the younger horses, they don’t always pay attention to what she asks and that frustrates her. It makes for a great analogy to share when she is being “stubborn.”  (Not that that ever happens with a 9-year-old!)

Morgan has learned to be comfortable with the silence they share, even when she is nowhere in sight of any one else and I worry she may be “lost.” Paco always knows the way and she knows there isn’t any reason to be afraid.

Morgan concerns herself with the fact that Paco is going to die someday. Truth be told, we all do. She gets tears in her eyes when she thinks about it or what she asks questions about him like “when he is going to die?” I often catch her just looking at him in silence, I know what she’s thinking. The thought causes her to pay better attention to him and what he’s all about because she knows we won’t have him forever. Not physically anyway; always in our hearts though.

This summer, I think Morgan will be ready to pass him on to the next one in line that needs a “teacher”, and trust me when I say there is a herd waiting.

Morgan doesn’t know this yet, but Paco will let her know when she’s ready to do so, that’s what good teachers do.

Thank you, Paco, for taking such good care of my littles, I wish you could live forever and teach them all.

Ranch Mom-Approved

Labor Day is an American holiday which is celebrated to honor the contributions that workers have made to add to the strength, prosperity, laws, and well-being of our country. Here at the Arizona Beef Council, we prefer to celebrate by listening to the clicking of the lighter on the grill, seeing the flames jump skyward upon ignition and then slapping a few tasty steaks and beef hot dogs on to sizzle. Because beef is so often the center of our Labor Day celebrations, we are bringing you Arizona ranch mom-approved beef appetizers so your whole day is beefy!

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Pam Turnbull, current Arizona State Cowbelles’ President, teaching students about beef and beef by-products.

Pam Turnbull, current Arizona State Cowbelles’ President and resident of Dragoon, AZ, shared with us her granddaughter’s favorite recipe for a cookout which could work as the main meal or something tasty to snack on while enjoying a cold one and conversation with friends and family. She said, “My granddaughter enjoys a simple beef kabob with pineapple in between the cubes of steak.” Here’s a similar recipe for your use. Just add pineapple to keep it up to par with the Turnbull family!

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Sarah King and her daughter on a gathering day. If you’re a busy mom like Sarah, you’re going to want to take note of her appetizer idea.

Sarah King, wife, mother, and rancher at the King Anvil Ranch, said “A seven-layer dip with ground beef as a layer is always a hit! I make it in a pie dish with ground beef, guacamole, salsa, shredded cheese, beans, sour cream and some green onions sprinkled on the top.” Who needs a recipe when you get details like that but just in case you’re domestically challenged and like a recipe (like us) here you go.

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Not only does Adriana help on the ranch, work in town, but she also supports her kids in raising and showing livestock for local stock shows and county fair.

Oftentimes, being a ranch mom also involves work in town. Adriana Arrington, rancher at the Mlazy J Ranch, is no stranger to this busy lifestyle, but loves it all the same! When asked what her favorite beef appetizer was she first asked her kids to vote on their favorite. The results are in: taco nachos made with their homegrown Arizona beef was the winner! Not only is this an easy recipe, but is super customizable and great to do when you need to use those random ingredients left over in the fridge.

 

 

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Lauren and her family enjoy lots of yummy protein via beef and dairy!

“I admit, usually beef is the main dish for me so I’m really having to think for a beef appetizer! I keep thinking chili, especially for transportability, and if you served it in cups instead of bowls it could be an appetizer right? And at our house, it is always served with lots of cheese and sour cream or Greek yogurt. Yay protein!” said Lauren Kerr, of Kerr Dairy. We like the way she thinks as getting the appetizer to the BBQ is often half the battle not to mention all of the delicious topping suggestions. Lauren’s husband, Wes, was recently featured on our blog. To learn more about Kerr Dairy and Lauren’s family check out that post here.

Did these Arizona ranch and dairy moms inspire you to cook up one of these delicious beef appetizers? We don’t see how you could resist. As you celebrate your Labor Day, we wish you relaxation, delicious food, and great company. Keep those grills on and the beef sizzling!

Meet Your Dairyman: Mark Rovey

This week we are excited to introduce to you Mark Rovey of Rovey Dairy. Mark is a current board member of the Arizona Beef Council and is the animal manager at his family’s farm in Glendale, Arizona. Enjoy learning about this unique farm!

Arizona Beef Council: Tell us a little bit about yourself, your family and about your dairy:

Mark Rovey: I’ve been managing the animals (this includes dairy cattle, beef cattle, dairy sheep, meat sheep, Watusi cattle, buffalo, llamas, and a donkey named Cinco) for 6 years. I gained experience in this role by helping my dad or other managers in the years prior. Basically, this is my life. I don’t really do anything else. This is what I do. Beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, something with the Watusis on the weekend.

First question

Currently, on the dairy, we milk 2,000 Jersey cows. The dairy was started in 1943. It was a Jersey dairy when my grandpa owned and ran it. My father, Paul Rovey, bought the dairy from my grandpa in the 70’s and converted it to Holstein dairy cows. In the early 90s, late 80s, he then started transitioning back to Jerseys. This started as a rogue 4H experiment because my older sister was starting to show animals and he wanted something more manageable for her to handle. He kept a few in the milking herd and liked them so much he just kept buying more and selling the Holsteins. We’ve been back to 100% Jerseys for the last 6 years. We only have one token Holstein left.

Diversification is an important part of our farm which is easily seen as you walk around our property. One our newest projects is running a herd of milking sheep. Our goal is to turn the sheep’s milk into cheese and sell it at our upcoming local store and around the valley.

How does the technology you use now differ from the technology that was passed down to you or that previous generations may have used?

One of the most important technologies is we now use is artificial insemination. This practice allows us to make a better animal by selecting and using the best bulls from across the country versus being limited to the bulls who are nearby.

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One example of a misting system set up in the shades provided to the cows.

Another technology we harness is the power of cooling systems. As soon as the sun comes up, we have fans and misters in all pens and those go on. If it’s above 80 degrees, we’re cooling our animals. Genetics help us with this too as we can select for animals who tolerate the heat more efficiently. We can turn cooling on a littler later in the year because the Jerseys can efficiently handle the heat.

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Misters are also installed along the side of the pen where cattle eat their feed.

Record keeping is another important one. All the cows have an electronic identification tag in their ears which allows us to use a wand to scan each cow which transfers to a hand-held computer. The wand will tell us if we need to do something with that cow if she is in the wrong pen or many other useful bits of information. Once you scan an animal with the wand, a wealth of information appears on the hand-held computer such as when she was born, her mom, how much milk she is giving, how much milk her mom gave, health issues and so much more. This helps us to keep extremely accurate records and eliminates the chance for human error when recording this information.

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Close management of all animals on the property is an important part of everyday life for Mark.

What are some common misconceptions that you think people may have about the way your raise your cows?

One of the most common misconceptions I hear is there is a chance of antibiotics being in milk. Every single load of milk which leaves our place is sampled not once but up to five times for quality and measuring of antibiotic residue. We take two samples here at our farm before it leaves. Then when it gets to United Dairymen of Arizona (UDA – a milk marketing cooperative owned by Arizona dairy families) before it gets unloaded, there are least two more samples taken. All those samples are tested before it’s taken off the milk truck. Each tank of milk is tested for quality and somatic cell count to ensure the milk is of the highest quality. If there is one cow which was given antibiotics and her milk somehow gets into a milk truck, even if there are 50,000 pounds of milk in that tank, it still flags it which means the entire tank of milk would be dumped and not used. If there is any antibiotic residue in the milk, it will get dumped, and there is no way around it. So many great things have happened with regards to milk quality over the years to ensure it is an incredibly safe product. Milk is tested more than any other food product.

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The red band on the back leg of this cow is one more step taken by Rovey Dairy to ensure no antibiotic residue gets in the milk supply. The red band indicates she has been treated for something and isn’t ready to be in the regular milking pen.

What is the most important thing that you do on your dairy and farm every day to make sure you are raising safe beef for the consumer?

The job I make sure I do every single day is ensuring all the animals we are responsible for having everything they need. If they need shade, feed or water, I make sure they have those things. If our animals are healthy, we’re not spending money to make them healthy. The easiest way to ensure they stay healthy is to give them a healthy, clean environment with good feed. It makes our whole world easier if they just start in a good environment where they are healthy.

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Training is another important component. The training helps our employees to know what the medicines and protocols are if they need to use them. It’s only reasonable to understand there will be a few animals who need to be treated but we need to make sure the employees know how to deal with the illness to ensure a quick recovery for our cows. They are trained on how to give the right dosage and how that medicine should be administered.

We train all of our employees using the National Dairy FARM Program which is a quality assurance program to ensure the best possible care and handling of dairy cows. We hold meetings twice a month to keep up on the skills we’ve learned using this program. This is important to ensure everyone knows how to handle cattle in the best way possible.

What is the most important piece of information that you would want people to know about you and the work you do on your dairy every day?

We’re here to have a business and make enough money to live. But to be able to do that we must take care of the animals so they stay healthy, can produce wholesome milk, and stay happy all while still making a living. Sometimes it’s hard work, but it’s worth it. We work to keep the animals healthy, ensure the product is high quality, and to keep doing what we’ve been doing for a long time.

How do you interact with your community?

My cousins started showing cattle back in the 80s and my dad noticed most people had to go out of state to buy their steers. They were spending a lot of money and not making anything back after the fair was over. He started buying beef cows and breeding them for show cattle. My cousins, siblings, and even kids from the surrounding neighborhood and schools benefited from this decision. A lot of the kids from the surrounding neighborhood didn’t have any sort of agriculture background. In fact, many of them lived in apartments and had never even owned a cat or dog. My dad would get them a steer, allow them to raise it here at the dairy, and teach them how to do the work required to prepare a steer for the show ring. Through this process, these kids would get an experience in raising and showing an animal while being surrounded by all sorts of agriculture. Some kids couldn’t afford this project so he would give the kids the steer and let them raise it on the property. Then after the fair, the kids would pay back the price of the steer and feed. They would make a little bit of money and leave with a good experience of agriculture. That was his goal. He figured these kids would end up being doctors, lawyers, politicians, etc., and they would have a good, firsthand experience with agriculture with the hope that they would come back to him with questions in the future instead of just looking it up on the internet.

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The Watusi cattle on property serve as more than just entertainment for visitors. When you see one of these steers out on a parade route you are more likely to remember the people with the animal and might look to those people are a future resource for questions.

In 2007, I took over the beef cows. I bred differently and kept more heifers back. In the last ten years, our show cattle program has come a long way. We still work with kids on payment plans and paying after fair, but those kids who also want to be competitive, can still come and buy something they can do well with here. It’s just getting better and better but still with the idea of helping kids out. What really matters to us is they can get a good project and learn something about animal agriculture from that animal.

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A steer raised by Mark who took Reserve Grand Champion Market Steer at the 2017 Maricopa County Fair.

If you could describe in one word the life of a dairyman, what would it be?

Interesting (he said with a chuckle).

Last one

Lastly and of course most importantly, what is your favorite cut of beef and how do you like to prepare it?

My favorite beef is anything directly off the grill. No plate or anything. Just standing next to the grill, grabbing a piece and eating it right there. It doesn’t matter what cut of beef it is as longs as it’s fresh off the grill. Carne Asada directly off the grill is perfect. It’s the whole atmosphere of a cookout with friends and family that makes it even better.

 

Beef: From Classroom to Classroom

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One group of teachers working on their beef sausage entry to the contest.

The smell of beef cooking filled the meeting room at the Loews Ventana Canyon Resort as teachers bustled about, working to prepare the perfect beef sausage. The 2017 Career and Technical Education (CTE) conference was underway, and the Beef Sausage Making course was the highlight of the schedule. Annually, teachers gather from across Arizona to participate in learning opportunities in order to bring more knowledge back to their classrooms to extend to their students. These CTE teachers were from the culinary, food service and family and consumer science departments of their respective high schools. 

In July, Tiffany Selchow and Lauren Maehling, Arizona Beef Council (ABC), with Shayla Hyde, ABC intern, along with University of Arizona Food Product and Safety Lab Director Dr. Sam Garcia led a group of 30 teachers in a three-hour-long session. They presented a lesson on Beef 101, as well as a section on processed meats: where it comes from and how it is made. Following the lesson, Dr. Garcia led the teachers in making their very own beef sausage. In this session, the teachers also received the first opportunity to apply for the Beef Up the Classroom grant which reimburses teachers for beef purchases.

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Dr. Sam Garcia and students taught teachers how to grind and stuff sausage.

The teachers were split into groups of three with access to an array of spices and ingredients for flavoring and about an hour and a half to do it all. The teachers collected their beef trimmings and Dr. Garcia, along with two of his students, ground the meat. The teams created a recipe and mixed in their seasonings. It was all stuffed into casings and then cooked to be presented for sampling and judging. The sausage was judged and enjoyed, and the winners were announced.

The winning teachers were Pattie Pastor and Catherine Marshall from Flagstaff High School and Stephanie Adams from Casa Grande High School. They each were awarded a griddle, hand-grinder, and stuffer for their classrooms.

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Seasoning is an important part of the equation for a delicious beef sausage!

With this experience fresh in their minds, the teachers could incorporate their learnings into their lesson plans and even build a curriculum around the outline of the workshop. The teachers left with extra sausages and smiles on their faces.

The summer of 2017 had been one for the books. I ended the hardest semester of my life in Spring of 2017 and then dove into the Arizona Beef Council internship shortly after.

I heard about the internship through my high school agriculture teacher. I thought I would apply along with a few other internships but this one stood outs as it looked like a great learning opportunity and a chance to broaden my horizons. I was sure I would get one of the other internships but was not as confident about this one. A stream of doubt ran through my head. “How, out of all the animal science majors and agriculture giants, would I, a journalism major at Arizona State University, land this internship?” Well, I did, and I can say it had been the best internship of my college career.

My first impression

First, I didn’t realize there would be two interns, and I was a little intimidated by the idea of my counter part; a University of Arizona student majoring in animal science. Was she mean? Did she buy into the rivalry between the UA and ASU and would that affect our relationship?  I didn’t know what to expect. Luckily, all of my worries were blown out of the water when I meant my colleague. She is a hard working and committed individual whom I have grown to love and call my friend over the past two months.

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Lauren Maehling, myself, Nicole Van Eerd and Tiffany Selchow at the start of the internship (Photo by Anna Aja)

Then I met my bosses. While I was under the guidance of the Arizona Beef Council staff, I was fortunate to interact with folks from the Arizona Cattle Growers Association, and they all have taught me more about the beef community in two months than I have learned in my 20 years on this earth. They also taught me the importance of effective communication and building relationships with consumers and growers alike.

The Field Trips

Sometimes I still can’t believe was part this internship paid me to go out with my intern compadre, to meet new people and learn more about the beef world in a real-life setting.

First, we went to the Bill Kerr Dairy and visited with Wes Kerr. He explained that just like so many before him, he is using the latest methods and technology to have a successful dairy business. We were lucky enough to see the process of collecting milk from the cows and even go to the barn where the calves reside.

Next, we went all the way down to Nogales, AZ where Dan Bell and Dean Fish took us in and showed us their worlds. We spent half the time on the Bell’s ranch, helping round up cattle, branding, vaccinating and gathering some less-than-compliant horses. Mr. Fish took us horseback to see the Santa Fe Ranch with the bonus of an explanation of the mysteries of life. He also explained how every rancher has different methods of raising cattle, but the goal is still the same: raising cattle in an efficient and safe way to make consumers feel good about what they are eating and to have happy cattle. We left with words of wisdom in our pockets for our future careers.

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Tagging calves at ZZ Cattle Company (Photo by Dan Bell)

I grew up farming with my dad and other members of our family. The sights and smells of alfalfa and cotton were the norm, along with the sounds of squealing pigs coming from the show pig barn at my house. I never really considered myself as a cowgirl mostly because I didn’t know what that really meant. I was a farm girl and a pig girl but not a cowgirl. Thanks to the efforts of Dan and Dean, I was able to discover who cowboys and cowgirls are. They are not just individuals who buy a pair of boots and a felt hat, walking with some sort of saddle swagger; they live and breathe cattle. It’s a way of life and a source of income. I will be forever grateful to have had the honor to live in that world for the short time that I did.

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Nicole and I embarking on our ride with Dean Fish (Photo by Dean Fish)

Then, we came back up to Pinal Feeding Co. in Maricopa, AZ. Our fearless chauffeur, Caline Gottwald, showed us the ins and outs of running a feed yard. It was incredible to see the sheer number of bovine on the property and the massive amounts of feed rations it takes to feed them. Feedlots may not be as glamorous as the dawn rising over the hills of a cattle ranch, but their role in raising beef for consumers is just as important as any other part of the beef life cycle.

It was fascinating to see how well kept the facilities are and the amount of care paid to all the cattle. Feedlots generally have a vet on staff and a nutritionist who make sure the cattle are kept healthy and thriving. Of course, life happens and sometimes it can be hard to work on a feedlot when things are not going according to plan, but I am confident that these devoted individuals do everything they can to prevent and protect their animals.

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Nicole and me at the Arizona/Mexico border in Nogales (Photo by Dean Fish)

 

Lastly came the tour of the JBS Beef Plant in Tolleson, AZ. Our energetic tour guide, Maria, took us through the various stages of meat processing and explained to us the importance of handling the meat safely as well as treating the cattle humanely when they come to their facility. It was an eye opening experience where I learned how my beef came to be from the farm to the table, and I can confidently say I am proud of where my beef comes from.

Convention and Other Fun Events

I had the opportunity to serve as an intern at the Arizona Cattle Growers Association Convention in Prescott, AZ. There, I talked with cattle ranchers from all across Arizona and learned a bit more about how beef is raised in my home state. It was an amazing opportunity to network and connect with the dedicated ranchers in the Sonora desert.

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ACGA Convention Intern Mackenzie Kimbro and I at the Steak Fry Dinner and Dance (Photo by Heidi Crnkovic)

I also went to the Arizona Academy of Dietetics and Nutritionist Conference in Phoenix, AZ with Lauren.  I was a little unsure how beef promotion would go over in a room of nutritionists, but the results were pleasantly surprising. I was able to communicate my love of beef and its nutrient value to many people and I was able to learn about their health concerns as well.

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Lauren and I at the ABC booth at the AZAND conference

We also went along on the Summer Agriculture Institute where teachers came to learn a little more about where their food comes from and how they can bring that knowledge into their classrooms. Coming from a strong agriculture background, I sometimes forget how little those who do not have the opportunities I have had know about animal and crop production. It was neat to see the important messages cattle ranchers like Andy Groseta had to share about the hardships of raising cattle but that it was worth the end result: food on the table.

Takeaways and Thank Yous

From knowing little about the beef community in Arizona to annoying my family friends with the copious amounts of knowledge I have gained over the summer this experience is something for which I will forever be grateful. I feel I am more educated and can address more consumer concerns about how beef is raised.

I have never felt more welcome and appreciated for my efforts as I have at this office working with Lauren, Tiffany, Heidi, Maria, Kim, Patrick, and Bass. I have made unforgettable memories which I will cherish through the years. From porcine to bovine, I love all meat; but remember Beef…It’s What’s For Dinner.

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Lauren, myself, Nicole and Tiffany at the end of the internship (Photo by Heidi Crnkovic)

In March of 2017 I was just your average college student: persistently bugging my professor for more work with cattle out at the feedlot, telling every high school student (and even some 10 year olds) how amazing college (the University of Arizona, of course) and Animal Science is, working at a cattle sale barn, spending every paycheck on my horse’s never ending credit line, dreaming of being back out on the ranch, and making plans for graduate school and a future in the beef community… ok, so maybe not your average college student. But, I was just going through my spring semester with a page long list of all the possibilities for my rapidly approaching summer when my old agriculture teacher, my boyfriend, my best friend, a professor, and several others all told me to apply for the Arizona Beef Council Internship. I looked it up, saw social media, and closed the screen. But after thinking, praying, and, I admit, mostly persuasion, I applied. A phone call interview, follow-up with references (the plus of working for cowgirls in high school is they are very stubborn, very persuasive, and thus the perfect reference), and a few months later, I arrived at the office in downtown Phoenix. Yes, DOWNTOWN PHOENIX! I said a quick farewell to dreams of cool weather and countrysides, then quickly smiled with astonishment and excitement that it was honestly me being blessed with this incredible opportunity to intern for the Arizona Beef Council. This is how the next nine weeks went; well, a very condensed version anyway. (I invite you to read the past AZ Beef blogs to learn more!)

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The ability to work on ranches and be directly involved in the beef community has fueled my passion and understanding towards it.

The first week, Shayla and I were able to join other agriculture leaders and 30 teachers for the Summer Agriculture Institute, a program that teaches kindergarten through 12th-grade teachers about agriculture in Arizona. The intent is to provide the educators with information and resources on how they can incorporate agriculture into their curriculum to educate today’s youth. While I do work with Ag in the Classroom, teaching kindergarten students is very different than teaching adults, and this week further developed my passion for educating Americans about the truth of agriculture and the beef community. Some of the stops included Andy Groseta’s ranch where teachers learned the importance of the relationship between cattle grazing and the health of the environment, a discussion with a forest ranger on the health of our forests, and a dinner with representatives from the Diablo Trust. It was a rewarding experience as we witnessed many of the teachers transform their opinions about agriculture and clear up misconceptions.

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Summer Ag Institute teachers getting personal encounters with Holstein steers at Heiden Land and Cattle.

In the following weeks, we worked in the office with amazing members of the beef community. We gained knowledge in communication, including how to utilize social media and online applications to create graphics, find the correct information, and interact with consumers both online and in person. We developed an understanding of the importance of selecting proper word choice and facts to tell the beef story in an honest yet non-offensive way. It was an eye-opening education. I have been involved in the production side of the beef community, including courses at the University of Arizona taught by esteemed professors, and while I continually interact with people not familiar with agricultural production (including my family), I had not realized the importance of reading one’s audience, selecting proper words, and being transparent and objective in telling the beef story. I also was unfamiliar with the full expanse of misinformation, biased articles, anti-agriculture organizations, and other information that is readily available and promoted to lead consumers astray. My passion for the beef community and telling its story continues to grow every day.

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Tiffany, Lauren (not pictured), and I dropped off beef jerky bouquets on National Jerky Day to promote beef, one of the numerous ways the AZ Beef Council works to link Americans with the beef story.

In addition to working in the office, Shayla and I were fortunate to attend different events as interns including the Women in Agriculture Conference and the Arizona Cattle Growers’ Association (ACGA) Convention. At the Women in Agriculture Conference, we learned more about future challenges that the agriculture community will face, the importance of women’s roles both in the family and in production, and how to reconnect with consumers and producers not involved in organizations. One highlight was an inspiring presentation by a couple who were refugees from Africa and now own a farm in Arizona.

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The Golos told an inspiring story of faith, perseverance, and dedication to the cause of family and agriculture.

At the ACGA Convention, we were privileged to join many individuals involved in the Arizona beef community. As policies were re-evaluated, current issues were tackled, and connections were made, we saw firsthand how the beef community works to ensure its success along with everyone involved while working to continuously improve how cattle are raised and how we care for rangelands. It was beneficial to hear diverse opinions and explanations for why certain practices are done the way they are done. I also enjoyed seeing current issues that the beef industry is facing and how they handle them. I am very passionate about being involved in, and educating consumers about, the beef community, and this opportunity to work for and interact with numerous individuals in different aspects of the beef community was inspiring and extremely informative. There was a lot of fun, and a lot of education and this experience truly attested to the diversity and team work incorporated into the beef community. I was honored to help contribute to making convention successful.

This amazing internship also gave us the opportunity to meet influential and successful individuals and families in the beef community, which included working tours at beef facilities as well as the rewarding task of representing these families and their stories in Arizona Beef blogs. The first stop on our industry tour was the Kerr Family Dairy in Buckeye, hosted by Wes Kerr. Wes amazed us with his focus on animal welfare and a progressive mentality. He described how his grandfather never imagined the day when all dairies would have shades, and now technology has come so far to include Wes’ work with progressing genetics to have all polled (hornless) dairy cattle. Wes’ dairy was a beautiful example of superior animal care, attention to consumer demands and industry needs, and a progressive mentality. Thank you, Wes!

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Wes explained the importance of cattle rations (feed mixes) and how ingredients are selected to create the best results in cattle while utilizing by-products to reduce waste.

The next stop was a week-long vacation (err, long, grueling work week? In case Tiffany is reading this maybe I shouldn’t brag) down in Nogales with cattlemen Dan Bell and Dean Fish. We were blessed to join them in their daily ranch life, including the opportunity to gather cattle; brand, vaccinate, test, ear tag and castrate calves; ultrasound and palpate cows to check pregnancies; and perform other cattle management practices that ensure proper cattle records, health, and care. We also experienced monitoring and caring for the rangeland including proper fencing and cattle grazing rotation systems. We heard incite on the different ways of handling cattle to match individual ranches, including how to reduce stress for maximum productivity. We also attended the Southern Arizona Cattle Protective Association (SACPA) meeting and learned about current issues facing the beef community including the US-Mexico border, disease, and water regulations. It was an insightful opportunity to learn about different ranches and their management plans, and a refreshing break to be back out on a ranch. Mr. Bell and Dr. Fish were inspiring resources, sharing every detail of their work, showing us their challenges and successes, and giving us wisdom and advice for a joyful life. Thank you, Dan and Dean!

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Vaccinations are a crucial step in ensuring cattle health and a safe beef supply. Administration techniques are chosen based on ranch facilities and the best fit for individual practices and cattle health, and I was overjoyed to help.

Our next stop on touring the beef community was at Pinal Feeding Co in Maricopa. From the cow-calf ranch to the feedlot, this transition helped us learn about feeding cattle and the details involved. We learned more about cattle nutrition and how rations are made and delivered to provide the best care and results from cattle, including the importance of feeding at the right time of day. We learned about the complexity of technologies in managing and keeping records of cattle, as well as caring for sick cattle. Thank you, Bass and Caline! Afterward, we were privileged to tour the JBS Beef Processing Plant in Tolleson where we saw the care that workers take in supplying us with wholesome, safe, and healthy beef. I was impressed by the information our food safety tour guide explained to us. Every step of the process is carefully monitored with safety procedures, health and quality tests, and employees passionate about their jobs and the positive difference they make. Beef truly is a product we can feel safe, and good, about eating, knowing that it is raised with continuously improving sustainable practices, provided to us by families who care and is a delicious and nutritious source of food for ourselves and our families. Thank you, Maria!

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Holstein steers are fed personalized rations to maximize health and gains, with a carefully balanced mixture of forage (hay), grains, and supplements (including minerals and protein).

The beef community tours were not only enjoyable but also an educational look into the Arizona beef community and what the beef story truly is. From the promotion aspect in the office, to a dairy, to a cow-calf ranch, to the feedlot, to the packing plant, and with several stops to look at policies, regulations, issues, and development, I loved experiencing every piece of the beef story and hearing insight from a variety of farmers and ranchers with different backgrounds, scenarios, and ideologies. This experience increased my ability and desire to share the beef story and how cattle are raised by families, for families, in the most sustainable way, ensuring the health of cattle, the environment, and families.

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An important management practice on a cow-calf ranch is checking cattle pregnancies, and one method for this is palpation.

Overall, I cannot begin to express how rewarding my internship with the Arizona Beef Council was. I am incredibly blessed not only to have the amazing experience to learn from and interact with numerous individuals, families, and businesses in the beef community but also to be able to give back and assist in outreach and education to consumers. I gained endless skills and fueled my always growing passion for the beef community. And to top it all off, I was able to work with some of the nicest, most intelligent women in the beef community. One final thank you to everyone who encouraged me to apply for this amazing internship, to the committee who selected me, to my fellow intern and partner in crime Shayla, and to Tiffany and Lauren, my outstanding leaders, who I had seen present several times and never could have dreamed of the amazing opportunity to work with. And of course, thank you to the beef community. Eat beef, it’s what’s for dinner.

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Lauren, Shayla, myself, and Tiffany, the Arizona Beef Council summer team (family).

 

Boots, belts and felt hats filled the hallway of the Prescott Resort for the Arizona Cattle Growers’ Association Convention (ACGA). Ranchers, vendors and family members mingled over the latest in the beef community and how their ranches and families continue to change. Among these agricultural giants are some up-and-comers who seek to gain knowledge and aren’t afraid to work hard for it: the members of the Arizona Junior Livestock Association (AJLA).

The purpose of the AJLA is “to promote the welfare of the livestock community, to further the education and cooperation of young people interested in livestock, and to aid in the attainment of mutual goals set by AJLA members interested in all phases of this business and all possible career opportunities.”

 

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Preslee Whetton, AJLA Prepared Speech Contest winner, reciting her speech for ACGA Convention Participants (Photo by Heidi Crnkovic)

AJLA is a chance for the children who attend the annual convention with their parents a chance to participate in social time with other kids their age while offering learning opportunities and prizes for their efforts. AJLA members learn about and compete in prepared and impromptu speaking competitions, a quiz bowl and a livestock judging competition. These events have been part of the ACGA convention for almost 25 years and were incorporated when attendees noticed many children were drug along but didn’t have much to do other than sit in meetings with their parents.

“AJLA teaches us about livestock, caring for them and comparisons between different animals,” says Julian Arrington, a three-year member of the organization.

Arrington, 14, shows swine at livestock shows and helps run his family’s cattle ranch in Wilcox, AZ. He also participates in the livestock judging competition through AJLA and continues to learn about the anatomies of different animals.

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Julian Arrington showing his hog at his county fair. (Photo by Adrianna Arrington)

During the convention, members like Arrington are exposed to cattle ranchers and experts to facilitate their learning about the Arizona cattle community. For their impromptu competition, they were given the task to ask individuals about an assigned topic such as beef nutrition and the beef life cycle. After only 30 minutes, the participants share what they learned with the judges and the competition’s attendees in a speech format.

Aiden Bell, 9, has been a member of AJLA for five years. He helps run his family’s cattle ranch in Nogales, AZ, rounding up the cattle and learning more every day. This year at ACGA convention, he participated in the prepared speaking competition, talking about four different breeds of cattle: Angus, Brahma, Hereford, and Limousin.

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Members and leader, Roxie Bell, learning a few dance moves before the steak fry and dance. (Photo by Heidi Crnkovic)

“My favorite breed is Angus because we raise them,” says Bell. Bell’s mother, Roxanne “Roxie” Bell is the current leader of AJLA and has been held this position for eight years.

“The kids come from a variety of backgrounds,” says Roxanne. “Some have been showing [livestock] for years and some don’t much experience at all.” She says the organization is agriculture oriented, but also promotes learning and critical thinking skills needed in the real world.

The young members of AJLA are not to be looked over. The amount of information offered to their growing minds is incredible, and they take it in with a ferocious energy. They know what their families do for a living, they know why their parents work so hard to do it, and they want to learn and be part of it.

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AJLA Contest Participants (Photo by Heidi Crnkovic)

Blog Post was written by 2017 Arizona Beef Council Intern Shayla Hyde.

If you have ever spent any time working cattle, you know that it is a team effort. Who is in the starting lineup? It isn’t always just cowboys; a rancher’s company is usually made up of a trusty horse and, you guessed it, hard working Lassie! Dogs have been used to help humans since they were first domesticated, and a main use for them is helping ranchers. Cattle dogs herd, gather, sort and protect, both out on the range and in chutes and holding areas. Our canine friends are perfect for this job due to their quick speeds, smaller size, and agility. They are also prolific barkers, effective in directing even the most stubborn cattle. There are many breeds favored for ranch jobs including Collies, Border Collies, Blue Heelers, Australian Shepherds, Catahoulas, Pit Bulls and more, including the all-American favorite: the mutt. The best cattle dogs usually have strong loyalty, high energy, and solid training; so the Arizona Beef Council went out in the beef community to find them!

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A horse and a dog are sometimes the most important part of a rancher’s team, with skills and characteristics that humans don’t posses including endurance, speed and agility.

Out in Santa Cruz County, amidst the beautiful Santa Rita Mountains, you can find Salero Ranch. If you’re lucky, you might also find Mari Hudson out working cattle with her trusty partner, Sage, by her side. A two-year-old Border Collie and Hanging Tree cross, Sage is learning how to help around the ranch. Her favorite jobs include helping sort off neighboring cattle from the herd (so they can be returned to the neighbors without the Salero Ranch herd going as well), trailing cattle to keep them moving in the right direction, and keeping lazy cattle moving (if they stop, they might turn back and lead the herd astray or double the time ranchers must spend working.) Sage’s owner, Mari, speaks very highly of her furry friend, “When I’m out working cattle alone, she’s a huge help. Especially with cattle trying to shade up (cattle will stop moving forward when tired of being moved and continually turn around to try to go back to the treeline).” Mari also spoke about ranchers she knows who have outstanding dogs for working and stopping wild cattle. Without the dogs, their job would be much harder and more dangerous. Although she doesn’t have very wild cattle, Sage is still an excellent hand, and a cute one too!

In addition to working cattle, dogs can help ranchers train horses. If a horse is acting up, a well-trained dog can bark and apply pressure in a manner that causes the horse to stand quietly or go where being directed. An example of how dogs can help includes encouraging a horse to walk forward instead of fighting against a halter when being halter-broke. By using dogs, tasks involving livestock and horses can be done with less man power and stress.

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Dogs can apply pressure from behind to move animals with low stress.

Dogs are called “man’s best friend,” and cattle dogs work hard to prove it. When gathering or checking cattle out on the range, there are many great reasons to bring along the pup so desperately wanting to go, including their help in moving cattle, companionship, and safety. Safety? Yes, a story from a rancher down in Nogales attests to this reason. Maco, a hand at ZZ Ranch Cattle Co., always takes his mutt when out on the range. One day, he was attacked by a mountain lion. Without a moment of hesitation his dog stepped in, warding off the predator and saving Maco’s life. While the hero did suffer injuries, Maco stitched him up, and he healed quickly, ready to go back out again. Now that is a best friend.

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Dogs serve as companions, helpers and protection out on the range.

Not every working cattle dog works out on the ranch, and a perfect example is Sis (Sister) at Marana Stockyards. This tough little stockyard employee lives to work. According to Karen Parsons, she works so hard that when the weather is unbearably hot, Sis must be left at home because her work ethic is too strong and she won’t quit! If you venture out back around the cattle pens, you will see Sis hard at work pushing, stopping, and holding cattle. She is stubborn and agile (often jumping through fence panels sideways), and a dependable helper. She is dedicated to her work, and it does not matter who is out there checking and moving cattle, she will come and help.

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Sis helps push the cattle and keep them moving to the desired pen.

While dogs are great companions at home, they are also an essential tool for many ranchers and cattlemen in the beef community. They can reduce the number of cowboys needed, work cattle with lower stress, handle wild and unruly cattle, give protection to people and livestock, and bring a smile to your face. Man’s best friend, and man’s best worker.

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Working cattle dogs are trained to push, gather, hold, and stop cattle. They are also great protectors, a true asset to a ranch.

Blog post by Nicole Van Eerd, Arizona Beef Council 2017 Summer Intern.