Celebrating Heart Month with Arizona Beef

February is Heart Month, both in terms of love and the actual thing beating in your chest. We celebrate all that is love on the 14th of this month with romantic dinners for two and give extra attention to keeping your ticker ticking all month long. We want you to have the best Heart Month ever, so we’ve compiled a list of nutritional resources on how to include beef in a heart-healthy diet along with ways to get your significant other’s heart racing with love, beef included, of course.

Beef as Part of a Heart-Healthy Lifestyle

Eating for a healthy heart and enjoying one of your favorite foods—these two things don’t have to be at odds with one another! Recent research shows that eating lean beef as part of a heart healthy dietary pattern can help maintain normal cholesterol levels.

In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers from Penn State University found that people who participated in the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) Study, maintained healthy blood cholesterol levels while consuming a dietary pattern rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts and beans, with lean beef as the primary protein source. The BOLD diets contained 4-5.4 oz (weights before cooking) of lean beef daily, while providing less than 7% of calories from saturated fat, consistent with current fat intake targets. The BOLD study is the latest addition to the body of evidence that supports including lean beef in a heart-healthy diet. In fact, over 20 studies of lean beef in healthy dietary patterns support a role for lean beef in a heart healthy diet and lifestyle. Learn more by clicking here.

Lean Beef – A Super Satisfying Balance of Taste and Nutrition

If you are looking to celebrate Heart Month with something a little more lean, you are in luck. Beef has that too! What does lean mean? A cut of cooked fresh meat is considered “lean” when it contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 mg of cholesterol per 100 grams (3½ oz) and per RACC (Reference Amount Customarily Consumed), which is 85 grams (3 oz). Per 100 grams: Less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol. Odds are that you’re probably already cooking lean cuts at home or choosing one when dining out. Good for you! A telltale sign that a cut is lean is if the word “Round” or “Loin” is in the name—that’s quite a lot of cuts if you think about it!  In fact, thanks to enhancements in cattle breeding and feeding as well as improved trimming practices, more than 60 percent of whole muscle beef cuts found in the supermarket are considered lean when cooked with visible fat trimmed.1 Learn more about lean beef here.

The Nutrients You Need with a Taste You Love

When it comes to beef and your health, you can rest easy knowing that along with being delicious, beef contains important nutrients that your body needs. In just one 3 oz. cooked serving, you’re getting 10 essential nutrients, including about half your Daily Value for protein! Learn more about the nutrients in beef by clicking here.

Need Some Heart-Healthy Recipe Inspiration?

Enjoying lean beef in a heart-healthy lifestyle is easier than you think with these recipes featuring lean beef, fresh fruit and vegetables, and whole grains. These Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. recipes are all certified by the American Heart Association®. Click here for the recipe collection.

Fancy Night In: Filet Mignon with Mushroom Wine Sauce

And finally, because sometimes you just need a delicious meal to celebrate your Valentine on Valentine’s Day, Brooke from Brooke Appetit has the perfect solution. She created a delicious dinner for two for the Arizona Beef blog. She does a great job of giving you all the details so the shopping and preparation are easy to follow with a big payoff. Your mate will be extremely impressed with your culinary skills. Click here for the full recipe.

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